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TOPIC: The Moon


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Lunar crater Euclides D
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The lunar crater Euclides D (formerly named Eppinger) has been reinstated by the IAU.
The 6-km wide crater is named after the Greek mathematician Euclid, and is located at 9.4S, 25.7W

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RE: The Moon
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Louisville specialists crafted maps for Apollo 11 landing
Today it's a derelict building with boarded windows - but 40 years ago, the corner of 14th and West Broadway in Louisville was home to a little-known government office that played a crucial role in America's first trip to the moon.

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For 40 years, the rocks hauled back from the moon have been changing the history of the Earth as we knew it.
The lunar rocks suggest that a smaller planet slammed into ours 4.5 billion years ago, creating the moon and enlarging the Earth. They tell the tale of a storm of space debris violently pounding both the Earth and moon, perhaps triggered by a dramatic reshuffling of the entire solar system.
Scientists today are still studying those rocks, hoping to decipher whether life had already emerged before the near-apocalyptic pummelling 3.9 billion years ago - and, incredibly, survived.

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The moon is more than 4 billion years old and people used to think there were large areas of water as well as lunar species. But there are no settlements yet and the moon's "seas" are bone dry.
The Earth's satellite looks really old. It's turned completely grey and its face is marked with numerous wrinkles, stains and scars. It's visible: it's been through a lot in its lifespan. But given it's been around for some 4 and a half billion years, the moon has aged with dignity.

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Strange happenings on moon being reported

Are strange things happening on the moon?

"There have been reports of changes on the moon; unexplained flashes of light, dark spots or clouds, events on the surface that are hard to explain" - University of B.C. astronomy professor Paul Hickson

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Moon as Earth chronicle
The moon may appear soft and smooth from afar, but it contains mountainous regions and ravines.

"Studying it can help us understand what the earth was like millions of years ago" - G. Madhavan Nair, the chairman of the Space Commission and Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro).

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Transient lunar events
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Erupting gas may cause lunar flashes
Reports of ephemeral flashes of light seen on the Moon, dismissed by some as imaginary, could be due to the explosive discharge of gas beneath its surface. The analysis, by astronomer Arlin Crotts of Columbia University in New York, may breathe new life into investigations of its geological activity and history.


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RE: The Moon
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IBEX spacecraft detects fast neutral hydrogen
NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) spacecraft has made the first observations of very fast hydrogen atoms coming from the moon, following decades of speculation and searching for their existence.
During spacecraft commissioning, the IBEX team turned on the IBEX-Hi instrument, built primarily by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory, which measures atoms with speeds from about half a million to 2.5 million miles per hour. Its companion sensor, IBEX-Lo, built by Lockheed Martin, the University of New Hampshire, NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre, and the University of Bern in Switzerland, measures atoms with speeds from about one hundred thousand to 1.5 million mph.


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Newly restored photographs of the moon's dark south pole, taken by lunar orbiters in 1967, were released this week in anticipation of NASA's planned Thursday launch of two new probes that will investigate the region in search of underground ice.
Through the Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project, or LOIRP, experts have scanned and digitally refurbished nearly 1,800 photographs of the moon that satellites snapped in 1966 and 1967. This week, the project released new versions of images showing permanently shadowed craters at the moon's south pole, a prime target for NASA's latest lunar scouts.

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Transient Lunar Phenomena
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Reports of ephemeral flashes of light seen on the Moon, dismissed by some as imaginary, could be due to the explosive discharge of gas beneath its surface. The analysis, by astronomer Arlin Crotts of Columbia University in New York, may breathe new life into investigations of its geological activity and history.
Crotts mapped about 2,000 observations of bright flashes called transient lunar phenomena (TLPs) reported by astronomers during at least the past 350 years. The flashes last too long to be meteorite impacts, and many researchers have dismissed the reports as observational errors.
But when Crotts compared the most commonly reported sites of observation with a map of known gas leaks from the Moon's surface, he found a strong correlation.

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