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RE: Tethys
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The impact basin Odysseus can be seen on the eastern limb of Tethys.
This view of the anti-Saturn side of Tethys was taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on April 14, 2008 using a spectral filter sensitive to wavelengths of ultraviolet light centred at 338 nanometers, when the spaceprobe was approximately 1.1 million kilometres away and at a Sun-Tethys-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 26 degrees.

Odysseus
Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

North is toward the top of the picture.
Image scale is 7 kilometres per pixel.

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The IAU has approved 33 new names for surface features on Tethys. The new names include 31 craters, one chasma, and one montes.

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The Cassini spacecraft looks down onto the northern latitudes on Tethys.
The impact basin Odysseus can also be seen.

Tethys
Expand (29kb, 1024 x 768)
Credit NASA

The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on March 11, 2008when the probe was approximately 765,000 kilometres from Tethys and at a Sun-Tethys-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 97 degrees.

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One of Saturn's moons may once have harboured a liquid ocean beneath its icy surface, scientists have told a major conference in Houston, Texas.
Tethys is a mid-sized satellite with a density close to that of pure ice.
But a large valley system visible today must have formed when the crust was being heated and under great strain.

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Tethys map
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This global map of Saturn's moon Tethys was created using images taken during Cassini spacecraft flybys, with Voyager images filling in the gaps in Cassini's coverage.

Tethys
Expand (6.502mb, 12068 x 6408)
Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

The map is an equidistant projection and has a scale of 292.5 meters per pixel

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RE: Tethys
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This image of Tethys was taken by the Cassini spaceprobe on September 30, 2007, when it was approximately 184,424 kilometres away.

TETHYsEP30_ge2
Expand (328kb, 1024 x 1024)
Credit NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

The image was taken using the CL1 and CL2 filters.

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The view of Saturn's moon Tethys was obtained by the Cassini spacecraft on Aug. 30, 2007, from a distance of approximately 97,000 kilometres and at a sun-Tethys-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 51 degrees.

teth_ge9
Expand (375kb, 2183 x 2183)
Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

This mosaic was assembled from four clear filter, narrow-angle camera images. The view is an orthographic projection centred on 3 degrees south latitude, 119 degrees west longitude and has a resolution of 572 meters per pixel. An orthographic view is most like the view seen by a distant observer looking through a telescope. North is up.

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The view of Saturn's moon Tethys was obtained by the Cassini spacecraft on June 29, 2007, from a distance of approximately 38,000 kilometres and at a Sun-Tethys-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 152 degrees.

tethyAug1_7
Expand (263kb, 2143 x 3929)
Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

This mosaic was assembled from four clear filter, narrow-angle camera images, with low resolution, wide-angle camera data filling a small gap in coverage. The view is an orthographic projection and has a resolution of 211 metres per pixel. An orthographic view is most like the view seen by a distant observer looking through a telescope. North is up.

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This image of Tethys shows a band of slightly darker terrain at its equator.
The crater Odysseus is on the terminator.
The lit terrain seen here is on the leading hemisphere of Tethys. North is up.

tethysAug11
Expand (58kb, 1024 x 768)
Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Aug. 29, 2007, when the spacecraft was approximately 56,000 kilometres away.

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This (already posted) image of the leading hemisphere of Tethys was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on July 21, 2007, when it was approximately 452,000 kilometres away, and at a Sun-Tethys-spacecraft angle of 54 degrees.

Tethjuly21.07
Expand (66kb, 1024 x 768)
Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

North is up and rotated 15 degrees to the left.

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