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RE: Dinosaurs
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New Research Revises Conventions for Deciphering Colour in Dinosaurs While Suggesting Connection between Colour and Physiology

New research that revises recently established conventions allowing scientists to decipher colour in dinosaurs may also provide a tool for understanding the evolutionary emergence of flight and changes in dinosaur physiology prior to the origin of flight.
In a survey comparing the hair, skin, fuzz and feathers of living terrestrial vertebrates and fossil specimens, a research team from The University of Texas at Austin, The University of Akron, the China University of Geosciences and four other Chinese institutions found evidence for evolutionary shifts in the relationship between colour and the shape of pigment-containing organelles known as melanosomes, as reported in the Feb. 13 edition of Nature.

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Judiceratops tigris
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New three-horned dinosaur discovered

Scientists analysing fossil records have discovered a new three-horned dinosaur, dating back 66 to 80 million years, that sported a hoodie-like growth on the back of its head.
The giant creature may be the oldest known cousin of Triceratops and Torosaurus -- the best-known horned dinosaurs -- yet, researchers say.
Judiceratops tigris has been identified based on fossils from north central Montana, further underscoring the diversity of large, plant-eating horned dinosaurs among the fauna of western North America 66 to 80 million years ago
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Acrotholus audeti
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Oldest dinosaur of its kind unearthed in Canada

Scientists have unveiled a new species of bone-headed dinosaur, which they say is the oldest in North America, and possibly the world.
The dog-sized plant-eater had a dome-shaped skull that may have been used to head-butt other dinosaurs.

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Research at Mines Unearths New Dinosaur Species

A South Dakota School of Mines & Technology assistant professor and his team have discovered a new species of herbivorous dinosaur and today published the first fossil evidence of prehistoric crocodyliforms feeding on small dinosaurs.
Research by Clint Boyd, Ph.D., provides the first definitive evidence that plant-eating baby ornithopod dinosaurs were a food of choice for the crocodyliform, a now extinct relative of the crocodile family. While conducting their research, the team also discovered that this dinosaur prey was a previously unrecognised species of a small ornithopod dinosaur, which has yet to be named.

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Latirhinus uitstlani
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New dinosaur with giant nose discovered

Scientists have discovered a new dinosaur with a large prominent nose in northern Mexico, which lived about 73-million-years ago.
The duck-billed dinosaur, Latirhinus uitstlani lived during the Late Cretaceous period and its wide nasal cavity might have given it incredible smell-detecting ability.

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Nyasasaurus parringtoni
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New contender for oldest dinosaur

Palaeontologists have found what is likely to be the oldest known dinosaur, filling in a yawning evolutionary gap.
A study in Biology Letters describes Nyasasaurus parringtoni, a new species from 10-15 million years before the previous earliest dinosaur specimens.

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Scientists find oldest dinosaur - or closest relative yet

Researchers have discovered what may be the earliest dinosaur, a creature the size of a Labrador retriever, but with a five foot-long tail, that walked the Earth about 10 million years before more familiar dinosaurs like the small, swift-footed Eoraptor and Herrerasaurus.
The findings mean that the dinosaur lineage appeared 10 million to 15 million years earlier than fossils previously showed, originating in the Middle Triassic rather than in the Late Triassic period.

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Information about 65m-year-old dinosaur teeth uncovered

The duck-billed hadrosaur was a toothy creature with up to 1,400 teeth. The teeth migrated across the chewing surface, with sharp, enamel-edged front teeth moving sideways to become grinding teeth as the teeth matured.
The adaptation allowed hadrosaurs to bite off chunks of bark and stems and chew them to a digestible mush, leading Erickson to describe them as "walking pulp mills."
The teeth wore down at the rate of 1 millimetre per day, cycling through the jaw like a conveyor belt, before falling out or being swallowed. The dinosaurs lost about 1,800 teeth a year, leaving behind plenty of fossils for testing.

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Sauropod Neck Bones Were Really Tendons

Microscopic analysis of what were thought to be thin rib-like bones that ran the length of sauropods necks show them to be ossified tendons.

Sauropods like Brachiosaurus and Diplodocus were the biggest beasts to ever roam the Earth. And these dinosaurs had enormously long necks. Which poses an anatomical problem: they needed to move their necks side to side and up and down to graze, but that requires lots of muscles. And muscles are heavy. So how did they keep their heads from dragging on the ground?
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Pegomastax africanus
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Dwarf species of fanged dinosaur emerges from southern Africa

A new species of plant-eating dinosaur with tiny, 1-inch-long jaws has come to light in South African rocks dating to the early dinosaur era, some 200 million years ago.
This "punk-sized" herbivore is one of a menagerie of bizarre, tiny, fanged plant-eaters called heterodontosaurs, or "different toothed reptiles," which were among the first dinosaurs to spread across the planet.
The single specimen of the new species was originally chipped out of red rock in southern Africa in the 1960s and discovered in a collection of fossils at Harvard University by Paul Sereno,

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