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Mound Builders
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Today archaeologists are bringing new research methodologies to old questions regarding the social and cultural characteristics of the ancient peoples, popularly known as the Mound Builders.
Eastern Illinois University history professor Terry Barnhart will discuss some of those recent findings at 6:30 p.m. Nov. 30 in the Marshall Public Library’s Dale McConchie Meeting Room

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Newark Earthworks
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Barbara Crandell, a Cherokee elder co-founded the Native American Alliance of Ohio in 1992. Composed primarily of descendants of Eastern Woodland Indians, NAAO works to increase public awareness of Indian people in Ohio and to protect mound complexes and other sacred sites.

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pre-Columbian culture
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Experts are examining the ruins of a pre-Columbian culture in an area of Honduras where there had been no previous evidence of major indigenous civilization.
The site, discovered earlier this year, consists of 14 mounds that form part of what are believed to be ceremonial grounds, the Honduran Institute of Anthropology said.

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RE: Ancient Earthworks
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The Moundbuilders Country Club golf course sits on the Newark Earthworks, the world's largest mound complex, built 2,000 years ago by ancestral indigenous people in what was then a managed prairie landscape, kept largely free of trees by periodic burning. The site includes grass-covered, precisely sculpted earthen walls defining a 20-acre circle and a 50-acre octagon, as well as freestanding mounds, or artificial hills. Portions of the vast installation align with important lunar events - including the northernmost and southernmost rises and sets of the moon's 18.6-year cycle. Walled roads as long as 60 miles appear to have connected it to other mound complexes around central Ohio.

Denison College professor emeritus of physics and astronomy Michael Mickelson called the site ''an ancient solid-state lunar computer,'' and a British archaeologist cataloguing wonders of the ancient world recently placed it on the list.

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The US Midwest’s immense earthworks, structures built by ancient Native American cultures, have been all but lost to plough and pavement. No longer. An ambitious effort by the University of Cincinnati has rebuilt the mounds of two millennia ago. These virtual earthworks will soon be set to travel.

Native American cultures that once flourished in Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana and West Virginia constructed geometric and animal-shaped earth works that often rivalled Stonehenge in their astronomical accuracy.
A few are still extant – Serpent Mound in Adams County, Ohio, for example – but most of the region’s ancient architecture was all but squandered. Earthworks, from as early as 600 BC that stretched over miles and rose to heights of 15 feet or more, were either gouged out or ploughed under in the 19th century or paved over for development in the 20th.

But now, this lost heritage from the Adena, Hopewell and Fort Ancient cultures is returning in the form of a travelling exhibit that will include virtual reconstructions of earthworks from 39 sites. The electronic recreations represent nearly ten years of work by an extensive team of architects, archaeologists, historians, technical experts and Native Americans. Project director is John Hancock, professor of architecture at the University of Cincinnati, working in partnership with the Centre for the Reconstruction of Historical and Archaeological Sites (CERHAS) at the University of Cincinnati. The title of the project and the coming travelling exhibit is: “EarthWorks: Virtual Explorations of the Ancient Ohio Valley.”

The “EarthWorks” reconstructions will be the centerpiece within a 500-square-foot travelling exhibit fabricated by the Cincinnati Museum Centre, which is also managing and administrating the national tour. The travelling exhibit will not only feature the electronic reconstructions of ancient earthworks but will also include a graphic timeline wall with cross cultural comparisons; a giant map wall of the Ohio River Valley (from the approximate location of Pittsburgh to Louisville) indicating placement of Native American earthworks; panels with diagrams, photos and text; and 3-D topographic models of five earthwork sites.
The exhibit opens June 20, 2006, at the Cincinnati Museum Centre. It remains at the museum centre till Sept. 7, 2006. Discussions are underway for national exhibits over the next three years.

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