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Alkborough's maze
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Conservationists have described how they have restored a rare medieval earth and grass maze in north Lincolnshire, but said they are no closer to solving the mystery of why and when it was made.
Julian's Bower is cut into the landscape at Alkborough and is a twisting and turning labyrinth of interlocking rings measuring 44ft across.
English Heritage unveiled the reopened monument after a major returfing operation.
Experts say the origins of the maze are shrouded in mystery but may combine elements of Greek myth, medieval penitence and innocent fun and games.
Some have noted how Alkborough's maze is strikingly similar to a floor design in the 13th-century French cathedral of Chartres.

Alkborough's m
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Latitude: 53.684848°N Longitude: -0.668822°W

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Ancient rings of shells
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They are, in a way, the leftovers of the South's oldest raw bar.
At several locations on Georgia's Sea Islands, prehistoric peoples of the Southeast built huge rings of oyster and clam shells some 9 feet high and as wide as a football field is long.
The rings are one of North America's earliest forms of community architecture. Back when Egyptian slaves were building the pyramids, the ancient people of America were erecting their own monuments to posterity culture on the half-shell.
Like the pyramids, dozens of circular and oval rings of varying sizes on the coasts of the Carolinas, Georgia and Florida, have endured for more than 4,000 years.
And although they have been studied, on and off, for more than a century, the rings, like the pyramids, have been slow to yield their secrets.

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RE: Ancient Earthworks
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Adriel Heisey began flying airplanes when he was 15, and he started taking pictures soon afterward.
Three decades later, he's earned a national reputation doing both, shooting and printing bird's-eye view landscapes that have appeared on the cover of National Geographic and in the Smithsonian Institution.
He'll be in Evansville today at Angel Mounds Historic Site to display "From Above: Images of a Storied Land," a collection of pictures of archaeological sites from the American Southwest. It will remain there through Sept. 2 in the exhibit's only Midwest stop on a nationwide tour.

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A $20,000 donation from the 3M Foundation will help protect two of the few remaining American Indian ceremonial mounds in Lawrence County.
The Oakville Indian Mounds, an 83-acre site owned by the Lawrence County Board of Education, is home to the Oakville Ceremonial Woodland Mound and the Copena Burial Mound.

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Skidaway Island
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As beer cans are cleared away, it's easier to appreciate the native American history on Skidaway.
It took Sandee Winter less than a minute to reach back thousands of years on Skidaway Island on Wednesday morning.
Crouched on the edge of an American Indian shell mound, she scanned layers of oysters packed tight over the centuries. In an instant she spied a buff-coloured pottery shard the size of her palm and eased it out of the excavation hole. The fragment was unpatterned, indicating it could be very old, perhaps crafted by an American Indian thousands of years ago.

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Kuwaiti burial mounds
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A team of Kuwaiti archaeologists excavating an archaeological site in Sabiyah discovered shards of pottery and two burial mounds — all dating back to the Bronze Age, says Sultan Duwaish, Senior Archaeologist at the Kuwait Museum and Antiquities Department. This comes after archaeologists late last year discovered a number of burial mounds, a vast majority of them dating back to the Bronze Age.      
The mounds found in Kuwait are similar to those which have been found in some of the GCC countries, including Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and Qatar. Sultan added that surveying and mapping of some mounds was in progress and that archaeologists expect to taste more success in the coming days. To a question as to whether the archaeological team would be able to excavate all the mounds discovered last year given the fact that only three archaeologists were taking part in excavation work, Sultan observed that "Our team is determined to wrap up excavation on time and everybody is doing their bit to see to it that we meet the desired result."

The sprawling archaeological site — located along the Sabiyah highway — has an uneven rocky surface and is under constant surveillance by members of National Council of Culture and Arts (NCCAL). Archaeologists last year found human skeletal remains in three burial mounds while some of the mounds contained pieces of pottery dating back to Hellenistic period as well as a large number of beads. The skeletal remains were later referred to Kuwait University for research purpose following which they were kept on display at the Kuwait National Museum.
Sultan observed that the two pottery pieces were discovered from burial mounds and are creamish in hue, saying the pottery shards in question do not resemble in any way those that were found by archaeologists last year. Excavation at the site will continue until end of April.

"Some of the burial mounds we discovered last year will be re-excavated in the coming days."

A group of archaeologists while surveying the archaeological site in the year 2000 found some shards of rocks and what followed was a series of studies and this gave archaeologists an avalanche of information pertaining to the rocks even as they soon tasted success when they discovered the burial mounds.

Source: Arab Times

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Posts: 131433
Date:
Octagon Earthworks
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The Octagon Earthworks in Newark is one remnant of the Newark Earthworks, recently listed by The Dispatch as one of the Seven Wonders of Ohio.
Earlham College professors Ray Hively and Robert Horn demonstrated in 1982 that the walls of this 2,000-yearold circle and octagon were aligned to the points on the horizon, marking the limits of the rising and setting of the moon during an 18.6-year cycle.
The implications of this argument for our understanding of the knowledge and abilities of the ancient American Indian builders of the earthworks are astounding. But how can we know whether they deliberately lined the walls up with the moon or whether the series of alignments is just an odd coincidence?
In the current issue of the Midcontinental Journal of Archaeology, Hively and Horn use statistics to address this question.

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82.44525W_40.05380N
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Latitude: 40.05345 N Longitude: 82.44297 W

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RE: Ancient Earthworks
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An archaeologist at Damavand Cultural Heritage and Tourism Office has warned that the ancient mounds of Soleh Ben and Soleh Ben village in Firouzkouh, Tehran province will be submerged once Namroud Dam is filled with water engulfing an area within a radius of 800 metres. Ebrahim Akbari told ISNA that the Energy Ministry is presently constructing Namroud Dam the feasibility studies for which began before 2001 and its construction will be completed by 2010.

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Ohio Ancient Earthworks
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The extensive earthen mounds and walls in southwest Ohio are unlikely a fortress, although they might have been used for social gatherings and religious ceremonies and astronomical viewings.
The site, atop a wooded bluff 235 feet above the Little Miami River in Warren County, was built 2,000 years ago by ancient Indians that archaeologists call Hopewells.
The intricate mounds stretch nearly 3 ½ miles and enclose about 100 acres atop a promontory on the east bank of the river in Washington Township.
The earthen walls are as high as 23 feet and as wide as 68 feet. The walls are divided by 67 crescent-shaped gateways. There are stone pavements in some places.
Some call Fort Ancient Ohio's Stonehenge and it is one of Ohio's top prehistoric sites.

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Lost Amazon civilization
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A well-known Japanese archaeologist said Tuesday a team he is leading has found further evidence of a little-known ancient civilization in the Bolivian Amazon.
Katsuyoshi Sanematsu, a professor of anthropology at Rikkyo University in Tokyo, completed an excavation in August of a massive man-made mound, or "loma," in Bolivia's northeastern Beni state.
Such mounds mark settlements of the Mojos civilization, which is thought to have flourished in the Amazon region for thousands of years before the arrival of the Spanish.

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