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TOPIC: Ancient Britains


L

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Ravelrig Hill Neolithic Roundhouse
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The remains of a hilltop home believed to be about 5,000 years old have been discovered on the outskirts of Edinburgh. The Neolithic roundhouse, found on a site where a quarry is due to be expanded, is one of the oldest prehistoric buildings to be discovered in the Scottish capital.
Archaeologists have hailed it as one of the most important finds ever made in Edinburgh because of its age - about the same as Skara Brae in Orkney - and unique location. It is also expected to help fill in a largely unknown chapter in Scottish history, when farming had only recently spread to Britain from Europe. The site, at Ravelrig Hill, near Dalmahoy, enjoys spectacular views across the Lothians and Fife. Experts believe the roundhouse was probably built by one of the first families of farmers to start producing their own food in the area.

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L

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RE: Ancient Britains
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A human skeleton thought to be 4,000 years old has been discovered on Lewis.
Soil erosion caused by a gale last month is believed to have exposed a small stone kist at Uig, on the west side of the island.

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L

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The largest hoard of prehistoric gold coins in Britain in modern times has been discovered by a metal detectorist in East Anglia.
The 824 gold staters, worth the modern equivalent of up to 1m when they were in circulation, were in a field near Wickham Market, Suffolk. Almost all the coins were minted by royal predecessors of Boudicca, the warrior queen of the Iceni tribe who revolted against Rome in AD 60.

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L

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River Thames
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A Nazi dagger, a Zulu spear and even a 5th Century BC Greek pot - dredging the River Thames has uncovered an array of riches dating back 10,000 years, from Mesolithic flints to ginger beer bottles.
The Reading Museum Service's Thames Water collection contains more than 500 items that were found by dredger crews between 1911 and 1980.

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L

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Neolithic settlement
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Transport Scotland denied claims that the discovery of a Neolithic settlement would delay a long-awaited bypass on the A96. The Scottish Government body said the Fochabers bypass, estimated to cost 19-25million and take two years to complete, 'remains on schedule to meet the timescale recently announced'.
Campaigners have waited decades for work to begin on the Fochabers scheme, which will divert traffic from the village's narrow High Street and Mosstodloch, and speed up the flow on the main Inverness-Aberdeen road. It was finally approved by Scottish ministers in 2003. An appeal lodged at the Court of Session by objectors was dismissed in 2007, clearing the way for work to start after years of delay. A three-year plan reiterated Transport Scotland's intentions to start work by the end of 2008 or early 2009, with completion expected by late 2010.
In a recent letter to Lennox Community Council, MSP Richard Lochhead said the discovery of an important Neolithic site, which had previously been undisturbed, had been made over the summer. His letter said further archaeological work would need to be carried out 'in the coming months'.
Hamish Moir, chairman of the Fochabers Bypass Action Group, was angry that they had not been told earlier about the Neolithic site. A spokesman for Transport Scotland said that archaeological work would be carried out on the Coal Brae site in parallel with the tender process and would not delay progress on the bypass. Gavin Cameron said background work had been carried out, including clearing the site and dealing with 'sensitive ecological issues'.

Source: The Press and Journal

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L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Lindow Moss
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A new photographic exhibition at Manchester Museum will bring to life the peat bog where one of the earliest Mancunians was unearthed.
The exhibition by Stephen Vaughan documents the landscape of Lindow Moss, the place where the preserved body of Lindow Man was found.
It opens on December 13 as part of an on-going display depicting Lindow Man's story. His body is being exhibited at the museum until April next year.

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RE: Ancient Britains
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A Bronze Age spearhead which lay submerged in a burn for 3,500 years has been discovered and handed to a museum. The spearhead was found wedged in a rock crevice in a burn at Mennock Water in Dumfriesshire (Scotland). It is now on display in Dumfries Museum. "It is in a remarkable condition having survived in the water for around 3,500 years," said the annual report of the Queen's and Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer.

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The possibility of a Palaeolithic human presence in Ireland has once again presented itself. A flaked flint dating to about 200,000 years ago found in Co Down is certainly of human workmanship, but its ultimate origin remains uncertain.
Discovered at Ballycullen, ten miles east of Belfast, the flake is 68mm long and wide and 31mm thick. Its originally dark surface is heavily patinated to a yellowish shade, and the lack of sharpness in its edges suggests that it has been rolled around by water or ice, Jon Stirland reports in Archaeology Ireland.

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Ancient relics dating from the Stone Age and up to 9,000 years old have been discovered in Wickford.
The stone fragments and what is believed to be the remnants of a prehistoric camp were found in a field off Old Nevendon Road.
The find, described as historically significant, was made on land due to be turned into flood plains and a wildlife habitat. The site is intended to replace land in Courtauld Road, Basildon, which would be lost if a planned waste plant is built there.

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A 96.5km path following the route of an ancient dyke, which may have been built 1,500 years ago, is being opened.
Wat's Dyke Heritage Trail between north Powys and Flintshire has been nearly nine years in the planning.
There are conflicting opinions about when the earthwork was built, but it could have been the 5th or 6th Century, pre-dating Offa's Dyke.

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