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Cave bone hints at prehistoric Devon cannibals
Deliberate cut marks on a 9,000-year-old human bone excavated in a west country cave more than a century ago suggest that prehistoric Devonians may have been cannibals.
Scientists at Oxford University have examined a fragment of human bone from Kents Cavern, near Torquay in Devon, after a curator spotted it in a mass of animal bone in a museum store. They concluded that it was part of the forearm of a human adult, and that the seven cut marks were deliberately made with a stone tool around the time of death.

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A human bone found in Devon with tool cuts thought to have been made during a ritual ceremony 9,000 years ago may be evidence of cannibalism.
Torquay Museum staff identified the arm bone as they documented animal remains discovered in Kents Cavern in Torquay.
The bone's marks are thought to have been made by stone tools and could indicate a ritual - or that the victim was devoured by other people.

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Iron Age Beccles site
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Archaeologists will return to a 2,000-year-old site on Beccles marshes this summer in a bid to finally unravel the mystery behind it.
A team of students from Birmingham University will spend three weeks excavating on the iron-age site just outside the town.
Three long rows of wooden posts inserted into the ground were unearthed while flood defence work was being carried out on the marshes in 2006.

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RE: Ancient Britains
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An ancient burial pit of dismembered bodies has been found under a road being built for the 2012 British Olympics, and is suspected to be a mass war grave from Roman times. Recently beginning the site excavation, archaeologists have not yet determined who the bones might belong to.

"We think that these dismembered bodies are likely to be native Iron Age Britons. . The question is - how did they die and who killed them" - Dig leader, David Score, of Oxford Archaeology

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Neolithic tombs
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A prehistoric complex including two 6,000-year-old tombs representing some of the earliest monuments built in Britain has been discovered by a team led by a Kingston University archaeologist. Dr Helen Wickstead and her colleagues were stunned and delighted to find the previously undiscovered Neolithic tombs, also known as long barrows, at a site at Damerham, Hampshire.
Some artefacts, including fragments of pottery and flint and stone tools, have already been recovered and later in the summer a team of volunteers will make a systematic survey of the site, recovering and recording any artefacts that have been brought to the surface by ploughing.
Dr Wickstead said that further work would help to reveal more about the Neolithic era.

"We hope that scientific methods will allow us to record these sites before they are completely eroded.  If we can excavate, we'll be able to say a lot more about Neolithic people in that area and find out things like who was buried there, what kinds of lives they led, and what the environment was like six thousand years ago" - Dr Helen Wickstead.

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A Bronze Age road has been found below Swansea's shifting foreshore.
The short section of track was discovered by a metal detector enthusiast and archaeologists have now dated it to around 4,000 years ago.
Woven from narrow branches of oak and alder the structure was covered in a thin layer of brushwood to provide a level walking-surface.
It was found in March when it was uncovered by storms but has since disappeared back under the marine clay.

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Archaeologists working for the National Trust think they have found west Dorset's oldest human settlement.

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The connection between an ancient civilisation and an Angus estate is being highlighted with a new trail for tourists. The Dun estate, near Montrose, is best known for its impressive 18th-century William Adam-designed mansion but the National Trust for Scotland (NTS) is shedding some light on the area's earlier inhabitants. The house's grounds include five sites of international interest, three sites of early occupation and two burial areas, pointing to a history which stretches back more than 4,000 years.

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Evidence has been found of Bronze age activity on the island of Iona, following an archaeological dig there.
A collection of bones, shells, pottery and tools were uncovered by archaeologists from the National Trust for Scotland.
The items were believed to date back to between 930 BC and 810 BC.

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Archaeologists have discovered the earliest evidence of human beings ever found in Scotland.
The flints were unearthed in a ploughed field near Biggar in South Lanarkshire.
They are similar to tools known to have been used in the Netherlands and northern Germany 14,000 years ago, or 12,000 BC.
They were probably used by hunters to kill reindeer, mammoth and giant elk and to cut up prey and prepare their skins.

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Scotland's oldest settlement, dating back 14,000 years, was near Biggar, in South Lanarkshire, archaeologists say.
The site, in a field north of the town, may have been a camp used by hunters following migrating herds of reindeer or wild horses across plains that are now covered by the North Sea. Its discovery means humans have lived in Scotland for 3,000 years longer than previously thought.

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