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TOPIC: Ancient Britains


L

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Ancient Britains
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A 2000-year-old Roman fort has been uncovered on the site of a new 60 million treatment plant for the Capital's drinking water.
The remains of the camp were discovered during preparations for the Glencorse works on the edge of the Pentland Hills Regional Park.
It is hoped the find will give archaeologists further clues about how the Romans organised their occupation of the Lothians in the first century AD.
The site is thought to be a Roman marching camp and is part of a network of other bases, watchtowers and camps across lowland Scotland.
Historians had suspected there were Roman remains at Glencorse from studying aerial photographs, but this is the first actual evidence to be found.

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L

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An unexpected historical discovery has been made at Scottish Water's site at Glencorse, near Penicuik a Roman marching camp nearly 2000 years old.
The revelation has provided another clue as to how the Romans organised their occupation of the Lothians.
It had not been confirmed whether the site was, in fact, a Roman marching camp, which had previously only been suggested by aerial photographs.

"We carry out a detailed site investigation on all sites as a matter of course, and found a change in the soil when we were digging the ground. We quickly contacted the regional archaeologist who was able to confirm the existence of a Roman marching camp on the site" - Kenny Naylor, Scottish Water's stakeholder manager for the Glencorse Water Treatment Works Project.

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A 29,000-year-old skeleton is being displayed in Wales for the first time since it was discovered in a Gower cave in the 1820s.
The Red Lady of Paviland, actually the remains of a young male, is the earliest formal human burial to have been found in western Europe.
It is going on show on Saturday at the National Museum in Cardiff.

Source: BBC News


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L

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A freelance archaeologist has uncovered what is thought to be the only known Anglo-Saxon royal burial site in the north of England.
Spectacular gold jewellery, weapons and clothing were found at the 109-grave cemetery, believed to date from the middle of the 7th Century.
Excavations were carried out after Steve Sherlock studied an aerial photo of the land near Redcar, Teesside.

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L

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Bronze Age Burial
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High tides and winds that have battered our shores have unearthed a burial mystery for archaeologists.
Erosion by the sea and weather has revealed what seems to be the remains of a Bronze Age child.
But what puzzled archaeologists was a layer of hard white material (gypsum) which appears to have been moulded around the body, like a casing.
The burial, found at Druridge Bay, Northumberland, had been purposely cut into a layer of peat which has been dated to between 3780BC and 1000BC.

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L

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Longhowe
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A charred hazelnut shell recovered during the excavations at Longhowe in Tankerness, earlier this year, has been dated to 6820-6660 BC.
Although Orkney has plenty of indications of early (pre-farming or Mesolithic) settlement in the form of stone tools, this is the first date to relate to this activity. It pushes back the dated settlement of Orkney by 3,000 years.
The hazelnut shell was found in a pocket of soil that had survived underneath the Bronze Age burial mound at Longhowe and provides a context for numerous stone arrowheads and other tools, which were found both in the soil below, and in, the matrix of the mound.

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L

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RE: Ancient Britains
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DISCOVERY AND EXCAVATION IN SCOTLAND
Council for Scottish Archaeology, 2007

The project to scan the complete run of Discovery and Excavation in Scotland, from the earliest typescripts in 1947 onwards, was generously funded by the Russell Trust and produced with the support and assistance of the Archaeology Data Service.
The full run of Discovery and Excavation in Scotland is now available digitally, with the exception of the most recent five volumes. These are available in print form to members of the Council for Scottish Archaeology.

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This week Inverness will host the first annual meeting of Scotland's Rural Past, a five-year project to investigate and record Scotland's rural heritage.
The project, being led by the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland (RCAHMS), takes into account the amount of evidence that still survives of the pre-industrialised countryside. This includes ruined buildings, farmsteads, townships, field systems, earthworks, boundary dykes, limekilns and sheepfolds.

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County archaeologists have spent months digging the dirt at Credenhill Park Wood (Herefordshire, England). But they were given a helping hand by the Time Team TV crew, who spent a day filming in the county as part of a planned documentary on hill forts in the UK. The wooded hill is the site of one of the largest three hill forts in the country, and digging is currently taking place to determine its extent.
With the help of students from Cardiff University, a number of trenches have been dug, revealing pottery, Roman coins and possible saw pits. Such trenches and more were shown off by county archaeologist Dr Keith Ray to Time Team presenter Phil Harding and his team of researchers last month. Phil enthused over the work.

"There are more hill forts in Herefordshire than any other county. The fact that the one at Credenhill is being excavated provided a perfect opportunity to explore hill forts further as part of our documentary" - Dr Keith Ray.

Excavation work will take place over three years and is part of a longer-term project being carried out in partnership with the Woodland Trust. The dig is the first on a county hill fort for 40 years, and is being overseen by Peter Dorling of Herefordshire Archaeology. But their efforts will receive a massive boost next year when Time Team returns - this time from above. The makers of the Channel 4 programme have agreed to scan the area with Lidar, which bounces lasers off the ground to pick up mounds and soil discrepancies. The findings should give the archaeology team a more precise indication of where activities took place and their date. In the meantime, The Woodland Trust is improving access to the fort, and making it more recognisable to visitors. The Time Team documentary is expected to be shown next spring.

Source: Hereford Times

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Ancient Scots
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Ancient Scots braved the elements to establish community as early as 13000 years ago, during the last Ice Age, a new study in the current issue of British Archaeology has revealed.
The study suggests that the earliest Scots shared a common ancestor with the first Norwegians, meaning that some people of Scottish descent could be distantly related to modern Norwegians.
Woodward, an archaeologist at Orkney College, and her team excavated two broken flint points, which either served as arrowheads or spear tips, during a field study, on the island of Stronsay, Orkney, in the north of Scotland.
Woodward said the points matched others found at early Scottish sites, as also with those discovered in what is now northern Germany, dating to even earlier time periods.
She said the points discovered at Stronsay dated to around 13,000 years ago, and likely predated an 8,500 BC Edinburgh hunting campsite, previously thought to have been Scotland's oldest settlement.

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