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TOPIC: Japan Quake


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RE: Japan Quake
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Japan quake: Images of then and now

The massive earthquake and tsunami that struck off the coast of Japan on 11 March caused widespread devastation.
Six months on, the Japanese people are making progress in repairing the damage to their country and their lives.

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A strong magnitude 6.5 earthquake occurred at 05:36:32 (UTC) on Friday, August 19, 2011, near the east coast of Honshu, 100 km NE from Iwaki, at a depth of 39.1 km.

Location 37.667N, 141.747E



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A strong magnitude 6.2 earthquake occurred at 11:44:07 (UTC) on Wednesday, August 17, 2011, off the east coast of Honshu, 304 km East of Iwaki, at a depth of 10 km.

Location 36.776N, 143.773E



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Tohoku Tsunami
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Tohoku Tsunami Created Icebergs In Antarctica

A NASA scientist and her colleagues were able to observe for the first time the power of an earthquake and tsunami to break off large icebergs a hemisphere away.
Kelly Brunt, a cryosphere specialist at Goddard Space Flight Centre, Greenbelt, Md., and colleagues were able to link the calving of icebergs from the Sulzberger Ice Shelf in Antarctica following the Tohoku Tsunami, which originated with an earthquake off the coast of Japan in March 2011. The finding, detailed in a paper published online today in the Journal of Glaciology, marks the first direct observation of such a connection between tsunamis and icebergs.

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A strong magnitude 6.4 earthquake occurred at 18:53:52 (UTC) on Saturday, July 30, 2011, near the east coast of Honshu, 18 km SE from Iwaki, at a depth of 43.5 km.

Location 36.966N, 141.058E



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A strong magnitude 6.2 earthquake occurred at 18:51:25 (UTC) on Sunday, July 24, 2011, near the east coast of Honshu, 79 km SE from Sendai, at a depth of 35.6 km.

Location 37.758N, 141.540E



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A strong magnitude 6.4 earthquake occurred at 04:34:24 (UTC) on Saturday, July 23, 2011, near the east coast of Honshu, 112 km SE of Morioka, at a depth of 38.6 km.

Location 38.932N, 141.907E



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A major magnitude 7.0 earthquake occurred at 00:57:12 (UTC) on Sunday, July 10, 2011, off the east coast of Honshu, 212 km East of Sendai, at a depth of 18 km.

Location 38.040N, 143.287E



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A strong magnitude 6.7 earthquake occurred at 21:50:54 (UTC) on Wednesday, June 22, 2011, near the east coast of Honshu, 108 km SE from Hachinohe, at a depth of 20 km.

Location 39.900N, 142.500E



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Great Tohoku earthquake
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Title: Atmosphere-Ionosphere Response to the M9 Tohoku Earthquake Revealed by Joined Satellite and Ground Observations. Preliminary results
Authors: Dimitar Ouzounov, Sergey Pulinets, Alexey Romanov, Alexander Romanov, Konstantin Tsybulya, Dimitri Davidenko, Menas Kafatos, Patrick Taylor

The recent M9 Tohoku Japan earthquake of March 11, 2011 was the largest recorded earthquake ever to hit this nation. We retrospectively analysed the temporal and spatial variations of four different physical parameters - outgoing long wave radiation (OLR), GPS/TEC, Low-Earth orbit tomography and critical frequency foF2. These changes characterize the state of the atmosphere and ionosphere several days before the onset of this earthquake. Our first results show that on March 8th a rapid increase of emitted infrared radiation was observed from the satellite data and an anomaly developed near the epicenter. The GPS/TEC data indicate an increase and variation in electron density reaching a maximum value on March 8. Starting on this day in the lower ionospheric there was also confirmed an abnormal TEC variation over the epicenter. From March 3-11 a large increase in electron concentration was recorded at all four Japanese ground based ionosondes, which return to normal after the main earthquake. We found a positive correlation between the atmospheric and ionospheric anomalies and the Tohoku earthquake. This study may lead to a better understanding of the response of the atmosphere /ionosphere to the Great Tohoku earthquake

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