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Post Info TOPIC: Mimas


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RE: Mimas
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This image taken by the Cassini spaceprobe shows Mimas and Saturn's rings from about 14 degrees below the ringplane.

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Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

The image was taken using a spectral filter sensitive to wavelengths of infrared light centred at 853 nanometers. The view was obtained with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on May 11, 2007 at a distance of approximately 720,000 kilometres from Saturn.

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This image of Mimas was taken by the Cassini spaceprobe on May 22, 2007, when it was approximately 1,831,906 kilometres away.

Mimas83443
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Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

The image was taken using the CL1 and CL2 filters.

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Cassini captured Saturn's south polar region and the tiny icy moon Mimas on the left.
This view looks toward the lit side of the rings from about 28 degrees below the ring plane.

mimasSat3
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Credit NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Images taken using red, green and blue spectral filters were combined to create this colour view. The view was acquired with the wide-angle camera on Feb. 20, 2007, at a distance of approximately 1 million kilometres from Saturn. Image scale is 58 kilometres per pixel.

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Map of Mimas
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This global digital map of Saturn's moon Mimas was created using data taken by the Cassini spacecraft, with gaps in coverage filled in by NASA's Voyager spacecraft data. The map is an equidistant projection and has a scale of 400 meters per pixel. Equidistant projections preserve distances on a body, with some distortion of area and direction.

MimasMAP
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Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

The mean radius of Mimas used for projection of this map is 198 kilometres.
This map is an update to the version released in December 2005.

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This extreme false-colour view of Mimas shows colour variation across the moon's surface.
To create this false-colour view, ultraviolet, green and infrared images were combined into a single picture that isolates and maps regional colour differences. This "colour map" was then superimposed onto a clear-filter image that preserves the relative brightness across the body.
The combination of colour map and brightness image shows how colours vary across Mimas' surface, and in particular, between the terrain on the extreme right side of this view and the rest of the surface. The origin of the colour differences is not yet understood, but may be caused by subtle differences in the surface composition between the two terrains.

PIA08841d
Credit: NASA/JPL/GSFC/Southwest Research Institute

The view is toward the southern hemisphere on the anti-Saturn side of Mimas.
The images were taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Nov. 20, 2006 at a distance of approximately 150,000 kilometres from Mimas. Image scale is 898 metres per pixel.

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This image of Mimas was taken by the Cassini space probe on November 20, 2006 when it was approximately 152,344 kilometres away. The image was taken using the P120 and MT2 filters.

Mimas70754
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This view shows the Saturn-facing hemisphere of Mimas. North is up and rotated 24 degrees to the left. The moon's night side is dimly lit by Saturnshine, which is sunlight reflected by the planet.

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The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Sept. 25, 2006 at a distance of approximately 552,000 kilometres from Mimas and at a Sun-Mimas-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 106 degrees. Image scale is 3 kilometres per pixel.

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The great basin that interrupts the contours of this moon's crescent identifies the satellite unmistakably as Mimas. The giant crater Herschel (130 kilometres wide) is this moon's most obvious feature.

Mimas

North on Mimas (397 kilometres across) is up and rotated 23 degrees to the left.
The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Sept. 8, 2006 at a distance of approximately 534,000 kilometres from Mimas and at a Sun-Mimas-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 115 degrees. Image scale is 3 kilometres per pixel.

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The bright, steep walls of the enormous crater, Herschel (130 kilometres wide), gleam in the sunlight on Mimas.

PIA08264b
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Credit NASA

The lit terrain seen here is on the leading hemisphere of Mimas (397 kilometres across). North is up.
The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Aug. 16, 2006 at a distance of approximately 221,000 kilometres from Mimas and at a Sun-Mimas-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 80 degrees. Image scale is 1 kilometre per pixel.

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This view captures Mimas against the hazy limb of Saturn.
The 130 kilometre-wide crater, Herschel, lies in the darkness at right.
North on Mimas is up and rotated 19 degrees to the right.


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The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on March 21, 2006 using a filter sensitive to wavelengths of ultraviolet light centred at 338 nanometers. The image was acquired at a distance of approximately 191,000 kilometres from Mimas and at a Sun-Mimas-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 91 degrees. Image scale is 1 kilometre per pixel.

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