* Astronomy

Members Login
Post Info TOPIC: The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)
Permalink  
 


LSST / AmLight

Spoiler



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Camera seeks dark energy clues

California scientists have given details of a telescope they are assembling to study "dark energy".
The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope is being purpose-built to discover more about the force that is accelerating the expansion of the Universe.
The LSST will study 20 billion galaxies in order to calculate the recession rate through cosmic time.

Read more



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

New Telescope To Make 10-Year Time Lapse Of Sky

Every 10 years, about two dozen of this country's top astronomers and astrophysicists get together under the auspices of the National Research Council and make a wish list. The list has on it the new telescopes these astronomers would most like to see built. At the last gathering, they said, in essence, "We most want the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope."
Here's why. A synoptic survey is a comprehensive map of every square inch of the night sky. The Large Synoptic Survey (LSST) will do that multiple times.

Read more 



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

The public will be able to see near real-time images from one of the world's most powerful telescopes with help from a Wayne State University physicist.
Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

BNL Involvement With Worlds Largest Wide-Angle Survey Telescope
Dark energy and dark matter - the mysterious "elephants in the sky" that many physicists are seeking - fascinate everyone. The known forms of energy and matter occupy about four percent of the universe, but what about the dark 96 percent? To learn more, an instrument is currently being planned for construction high on a mountain top north of Santiago, Chile: the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which will take pictures of the sky using a gigantic camera within a ground-based telescope.    

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Title: Parametrisation and Classification of 20 Billion LSST Objects: Lessons from SDSS
Authors: Z. Ivezic, T. Axelrod, A.C. Becker, et al

The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be a large, wide-field ground-based system designed to obtain, starting in 2015, multiple images of the sky that is visible from Cerro Pachon in Northern Chile. About 90% of the observing time will be devoted to a deep-wide-fast survey mode which will observe a 20,000 deg²  region about 1000 times during the anticipated 10 years of operations (distributed over six bands, ugrizy). Each 30-second long visit will deliver 5 \sigma depth for point sources of r ~24.5 on average. The co-added map will be about 3 magnitudes deeper, and will include 10 billion galaxies and a similar number of stars. We discuss various measurements that will be automatically performed for these 20 billion sources, and how they can be used for classification and determination of source physical and other properties. We provide a few classification examples based on SDSS data, such as colour classification of stars, colour-spatial proximity search for wide-angle binary stars, orbital-colour classification of asteroid families, and the recognition of main Galaxy components based on the distribution of stars in the position-metallicity-kinematics space. Guided by these examples, we anticipate that two grand classification challenges for LSST will be 1) rapid and robust classification of sources detected in difference images, and 2) simultaneous treatment of diverse astrometric and photometric time series measurements for an unprecedentedly large number of objects.

Read more (556kb, PDF)

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

The University of Arizona's Steward Mirror Lab has lifted the lid on its latest 8.4-meter mirror blank and pronounced it near-perfect - ready for a custom grinding and polishing job that will make it the most unusual telescope mirror ever built.
This single glass blank will actually become two mirrors, part of the novel three-mirror system of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. It will give astronomers the widest, deepest, most data-filled look at the night sky ever attempted.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Large Synoptic Survey Telescope
Permalink  
 


The single-piece primary and tertiary mirror blank cast for the LSST is "perfect", say project astronomers and engineers.

The LSST, or Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, a large survey telescope being built in northern Chile, requires three large mirrors to give crisp images over a record large field of view. The two largest of these mirrors are concentric and fit neatly onto a single mirror blank. The single-piece primary and tertiary mirror blank emerged from the oven at the University of Arizonas Steward Observatory Mirror Lab in Tucson, AZ, where team members gathered to celebrate this major milestone.

Read more


__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)
Permalink  
 


Imagine having to melt 24 tonnes of glass to make an 8.4-metre-wide telescope mirror. Now imagine if that were the easy part of the project.
The mirror-making for the ambitious Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) project is now underway, but the greatest challenges still lie ahead.
By 2015, the new $400 million observatory should begin recording the entire night sky every three days from its perch in the Chilean Andes. It will provide a vast treasure trove of data invaluable for tracking near-Earth asteroids, watching supernovae explosions and mulling the mysteries of dark matter and dark energy.

Source

The LSST primary/tertiary mirror experienced a successful High Fire over the weekend of March 28 & 29th, 2008, reaching a peak temperature of approximately 1165ºC (2125ºF). This event is the critical first step in fabricating  the key optical components of LSST, a unique wide-field survey telescope expected to see first-light in 2014 from Cerro Pachón, Chile. The LSST mirror will now anneal and cool gradually to room temperature over the next 100 days in the slowly rotating oven of the  UA Steward Observatory Mirror Lab, and will be removed for grinding and polishing in mid-August.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

The University of Arizona today began making the mirror for a giant telescope that the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University astronomers will use to learn more about the early universe.
The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope is billed as "the widest, fastest, deepest eye of the new digital age" and will gather enough information in one night to fill all the books in every branch of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh.
Workers at the University of Arizona's Steward Observatory Mirror Laboratory began loading 51,900 pounds of glass into the mirror mold early today. Two mirrors will be cast as a single piece of glass for the telescope.

Source
Read more

-- Edited by Blobrana at 09:16, 2008-03-18

__________________
1 2 3  >  Last»  | Page of 3  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard