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This stereographic projection of Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer images from the European Space Agency's Huygens probe combines 60 images in 31 triplets, projected from a height of 3,000 metres above the black 'lakebed' surface.



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The bright area to the north (top of the image) and west is higher than the rest of the terrain, and covered in dark lines that appear to be drainage channels.



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This mosaic from the Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer camera on the European Space Agency's Huygens probe combines 17 image triplets, projected from an altitude of 800 metres. The area covered is approximately 1,300 metres across (north at the top of the image). The smallest visible objects visible are less than five meters across, and the dark channels are 30 to 40 metres wide.

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The images were then stitched together using one of several projection algorithms (in this case 'gnomonic') to produce a full mosaic. The images used to construct this mosaic were taken on Jan. 14, 2005.




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The Cassini mission has made the most detailed ever study ever Saturnís largest moon, Titan, and its atmosphere. The results could lead to a better understanding of the conditions that existed on the young Earth.
Titanís atmosphere consists mainly of nitrogen, along with small amounts of organic material such as methane. The pressure at the surface is about 1.5 atmospheres, which is quite similar to the Earth, but the temperature is only about 90 K. At such low temperatures the methane in Titanís atmosphere could play a similar role to the water in Earthís atmosphere.
Titan's surface appears to be young, with few impact craters, according to Steve Wall of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and co-workers who used the Cassini Titan Radar Mapper to image about 1% of the surface. They also observed a variety of geological features such as volcanoes and surface flows with evidence for porous ice. Moreover, dark patches in the radar images imply that it could contain frozen hydrocarbons
Michael Flaser of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre used the Composite Infrared Spectrometer on Cassini to analyse the methane and carbon monoxide in Titanís atmosphere, and found that the amount of these and other hydrocarbon molecules present, vary with season.
The atmosphere at Titanís poles in winter may be similar to the ozone hole above the Antarctic, but with different chemistry.
Other results show that the bulk composition of Titanís upper atmosphere does not seem to have changed greatly since it was measured by the Voyager 1 spacecraft more than 20 years ago. Data from an ultraviolet imaging spectrometer and a neutral mass spectrometer provide evidence for the presence of several organic species, including molecular nitrogen, methane, molecular hydrogen, argon and a host of stable carbon-nitrile compounds.
Other studies report on how Titanís atmosphere interacts with energetic particles, which come mainly from Saturnís magnetosphere. These interactions provide energy for the continuous production of complex hydrocarbons and nitriles from atmospheric methane and nitrogen. Finally, results from a magnetometer show that Titan does not have an internal magnetic field.

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