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TOPIC: Iapetus


L

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RE: Iapetus
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Warm and Dry on Iapetus
Warm and Dry on Iapetus
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Tiny Grains on Iapetus -- Labeled
Tiny Grains on Iapetus -- Labelled
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Tiny Grains on Iapetus
Tiny Grains on Iapetus
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Cluster of Moons
Cluster of Moons
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Iapetus' Equatorial Region -- Labeled
Iapetus' Equatorial Region -- Labelled
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Two Ultraviolet Views of Iapetus
Two Ultraviolet Views of Iapetus
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Iapetus' Equatorial Region
Iapetus' Equatorial Region
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The Other Side of Iapetus
The Other Side of Iapetus
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Credit NASA/JPL/GSFC/SwRI/SSI

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Scientists are on the trail of Iapetus' mysterious dark side, which seems to be home to a bizarre 'runaway' process that is transporting vaporised water ice from the dark areas to the white areas of the Saturnian moon.
Infrared observations from the fly-by confirm that the dark material is warm enough (approximately -146C or 127 Kelvin) for very slow release of water vapour from water ice, and this process is probably a major factor in determining the distinct brightness boundaries.


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NASA scientists are on the trail of Iapetus' mysterious dark side, which seems to be home to a bizarre "runaway" process that is transporting vaporised water ice from the dark areas to the white areas of the Saturnian moon.
This "thermal segregation" model may explain many details of the moon's strange and dramatically two-toned appearance, which have been revealed exquisitely in images collected during a recent close flyby of Iapetus by NASA's Cassini spacecraft.
Infrared observations from the flyby confirm that the dark material is warm enough (approximately minus 230 degrees Fahrenheit or 127 Kelvin) for very slow release of water vapour from water ice, and this process is probably a major factor in determining the distinct brightness boundaries.

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This image of Iapetus was taken by the Cassini spaceprobe on September 17, 2007, when it was approximately 1,336,103 kilometres away.

iapSep1707
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Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

The image was taken using the CL1 and CL2 filters.

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This image of Iapetus was taken by the Cassini space probe on September 11, 2007, when it was approximately 81,835 kilometres.

iap92144
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Credit NASA

The image was taken using the UV2 and UV3 filters.

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L

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This image of Iapetus was taken by the Cassini space probe on September 10, 2007, when it was approximately 71,873 kilometres away.

iap35213
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Credit NASA

The image was taken using the CL1 and GRN filters.

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This is a 15-frame mosaic of most of Iapetus' trailing hemisphere, which was composed by Gordan Ugarkovic.

iapglobalMos


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iap8375
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Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

This image was taken on Sept. 10, 2007, with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera at a distance of approximately 9,240 kilometres from Iapetus. Image scale is 55 meters per pixel.
The terrain seen here is located on the equator of Iapetus at approximately 199 degrees west longitude, in the transition region between the moon's bright and dark hemispheres. North is up.

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iap8373
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Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

This image was taken on Sept. 10, 2007, with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera at a distance of approximately 5,260 kilometres from Iapetus.

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