* Astronomy

Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: Hyperion


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Hyperion
Permalink  
 


This extreme false-colour view of Hyperion shows colour variation across the impact-blasted surface of the tumbling moon.

PIA08236
Credit NASA/JPL

To create this false-colour view, ultraviolet, green and infrared images were combined into a single picture that isolates and maps regional colour differences. This "colour map" was then superposed over a clear-filter image that preserves the relative brightness across the body.
The combination of the colour map and brightness image shows how colours vary across Hyperion's surface in relation to geologic features. The origin of the colour differences is not yet understood, but may be caused by subtle differences in the surface composition or the sizes of grains making up the icy surface material on Hyperion (280 kilometres across).
The images used to create this view were acquired using the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on June 28, 2006 at a distance of approximately 294,000 kilometres from Hyperion. Image scale is 2 kilometres per pixel.

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

This image of Hyperion was taken by the Cassini space probe on June 28, 2006, when it was approximately 291,335 kilometres away.

N00063190

The image was taken using the CL1 and CL2 filters.

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

This image of Hyperion was taken by the Cassini spaceprobe on June 27, 2006, when it was approximately 549,103 kilometres away.

N00063041

The image was taken using the CL1 and IR3 filters.

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

The tumbling and irregularly shaped moon Hyperion was imaged by the Cassini spaceprobe in December 2005.
Hyperion is covered with closely packed and deeply etched pits. The warming action of the Sun on water ice lying beneath a darkened layer of surface material apparently has deepened and exaggerated the depressions already created by impacts.

The pervious image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on December 23, 2005 at a distance of 228,000 kilometres from Hyperion and at a Sun-Hyperion-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 77 degrees. Resolution in the original image was about 1.4 kilometres per pixel.
The image was magnified by a factor of two and contrast-enhanced to aid visibility.

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

This image was taken on December 23, 2005 by the Cassini spacecraft. Hyperion was approximately 228,961 kilometres away.


The image was taken using the CL1 and CL2 filters.

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Meri
Permalink  
 


Saturn's moon Hyperion's crater, Meri, blooms in this extreme colour-enhanced view. Meri is overprinted by a couple of smaller craters and displays dark material on its floor that is characteristic of many impact sites on this moon. The walls of craters seen here are noticeably smoother on their sloping sides than around their craggy rims.


Expand (99kb, 1016 x 1010)

To create this false-colour view, ultraviolet, green and infrared images were combined into a single black and white picture that isolates and maps regional colour differences. This "colour map" was then superimposed over a clear-filter image.
The combination of colour map and brightness image shows how the colours vary across the moon's surface in relation to geologic features. The origin of the colour differences is not yet understood, but may be caused by subtle differences in the surface composition or the sizes of grains making up the icy soil.
The images used to create this false-colour view were acquired on Sept. 26, 2005, at a mean distance of 17,900 kilometres from Hyperion. Image scale is about 110 meters per pixel.

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Hyperion
Permalink  
 


This false-colour view of Saturn's moon Hyperion reveals details across the moon's surface. Differences in colour could represent differences in the composition of surface materials.


Expand (121kb, 1024 x 1024)

Hyperion has a notably reddish tint when viewed in natural colour.
Images taken using infrared, green and ultraviolet spectral filters were combined to create this view. The images were taken with the Cassini spacecraft's narrow-angle camera at a distance of approximately 62,000 kilometres from Hyperion and at a Sun-Hyperion-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 52 degrees. The image scale is 362 meters per pixel.

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 


Expand (1Mb, 5569 x 2210)

This high-resolution Cassini mosaic shows that Hyperion truly has a surface different from any other in the Saturn system.

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Hyperion rotates chaotically, tumbling unpredictably under the influence of Saturn's and Titan's gravity.

Using Cassini's radar, the strength of Hyperion's gravity, and its mass is hoped to be measured, by slight changes in the speed of the Cassini spacecraft as it flew past.
The chemical make-up of Hyperion's surface will also be mapped. The moon is exceptionally dark, reflecting only 30% of the light that falls on it, with a distinctly red tint. It is thought that it is dusted with dark material drifting in from Saturn's sooty outer moon, Phoebe.

The new images from the recent flyby show a very heavily cratered surface, and a giant cliff face tens of kilometres high a remnant from a colossal impact.

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Hyperion Flyby
Permalink  
 



Expand (80kb, 1024 x 1024)
This image was taken on September 26, 2005 from approximately 17,732 kilometres away using the CL1 and CL2 filters.



This image was taken on September 26, 2005 from approximately 16,040 kilometres away using the CL1 and GRN filters.



This image was taken on September 26, 2005 from approximately 12,658 kilometres away using the CL1 and IR3 filters.



This image was taken on September 26, 2005 from approximately 10,629 kilometres away using the CL1 and IR3 filters.



This image was taken on September 26, 2005 from approximately 2,555 kilometres away using the P60 and GRN filters.



Expand (42kb, 1024 x 1024)
This image was taken on September 26, 2005 from approximately 31,784 kilometres away using the CL1 and CL2 filters.

__________________
«First  <  1 2 3 4 5  >  Last»  | Page of 5  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard