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L

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RE: Fossilised tree
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tree_albany_4Wattieza grew probably as high as 30 feet in a world yet to see flowers, reptiles or dinosaurs. The broken branches probably helped provide a hospitable habitat for centipede-like arthropods.

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The tree stood tall and spindly in the hot sun some 380 million years ago when something toppled it, maybe a storm or an earthquake.
It fell into water and dammed up a muddy delta. The mud and sand on top hardened into sedimentary rock, hiding the fossilized tree for eons - until Frank Mannolini came by with a hammer and chisel.
Over the last three years, Mannolini and his fellow New York State Museum fossil hunter Linda VanAller Hernick painstakingly uncovered and curated the tree crown and a separate trunk specimen found in a remote rock quarry in upstate New York.

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Kendall quarry
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Kendall quarry a trove of prehistoric material
Life from 310 million years ago discovered
Millions of years before dinosaurs roamed the earth, a river slowly washed sediment into a limestone cave in what is now Kendall County. Four years ago, a University of Illinois at Chicago class stumbled upon that cave during a field trip to a quarry.
Class members expected to find fossils from 450 million-year-old marine life, such as nautilus, because scientists believe a sea once covered northeast Illinois.
Instead, the site turned out to be a treasure trove of exceptionally well-preserved life from 310 million years ago.

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L

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RE: Fossilised tree
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Remnants from a cave embedded in a limestone quarry southwest of Chicago have yielded a fossil trove that may influence the known history of north central Illinois some 310 million years ago....The scientists think that a shallow sea covering today's north central Illinois during the geological Ordovician period about 450 million years ago formed the limestone. The caves were eroded in the limestone at the beginning of the Pennsylvanian period, about 315 million years ago. Within a few million years, sand, mud and organic debris from plants and animals -- some burned and turned to charcoal -- washed into the cave through surface openings, where it remained preserved but not compacted since that time.

Source

FOSSILCAVE
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Latitude: 41.476309N, Longitude: 88.438987W
(rough location)


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L

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Oldest North America pine tree
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An Illinois scientist says needles from what could be the oldest pine tree found in North America were discovered in a limestone cave near Morris, Ill.
The cave, found four years ago by a class from the University of Illinois at Chicago during a visit to a Kendall County limestone quarry, contains a "treasure trove of exceptionally well-preserved life from 310 million years ago".

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Fossilised Forest
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Although the rainforest may be alien, its circumstances aren't. The trees lived during a global warming period that eventually melted ice caps and reshaped coastlines. Researchers think that a massive die-off of the telephone-polelike lycopsid trees, certain fern species, and some marine creatures occurred around the same time. Paleobotanists have long wondered if the extinction resulted from the climate change, or if tectonic shifts that released CO2 into the atmosphere caused the extinction and the climate change.
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In this photo released Monday, April 23, 2007 by the Illinois State Geological Survey shows a fossil, part of a fossilised rain forest discovered in coal mines in Vermilion County in east central Illinois.

illTreeDevonian1
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Geologists say the area dates to the Carboniferous period, 300 million years ago. Researchers are probing the fossilised area which covers about 15 square miles, all more than 200 feet below ground, and is probably the largest intact rain forest from that period ever studied.
Credit Illinois State Geological Survey

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Ancient fossil forest
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Geologists have found the remains of a huge underground rainforest hidden in a coal mine in Illinois. The fossil forest, buried by an earthquake 300 million years ago, contains giant versions of several plant types alive today.
The forest is not the oldest to be discovered others are known that are up to 370 million years old it is the sheer size of the forest that is significant. It has allowed Falcon-Lang and his colleagues to show that the distribution of plant species that made up the forests in the Carboniferous era differed from region to region, rather than being randomly mixed.

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Devonian tree
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A Welsh scientist has identified one of the earliest ever trees, which gives vital clues to how life developed on land.
A fossil expert from Cardiff University was called in to examine ancient tree stumps exposed by flash flooding in New York state.
And the 385 million-year-old remnants found by Dr Christopher Berry reveal how the world's first forest ecosystems developed.
The ancient trees, which date from the Devonian period of the Palaeozoic era, dwarf the longevity of Wales' oldest living tree - a yew tree in a Conwy churchyard.

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RE: Fossilised tree
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An international research team has found evidence of the Earth's earliest forest trees, dating back 385 million years.
Upright stumps of fossilised trees were uncovered after a flash flood in Gilboa, upstate New York, more than a century ago. However, until now, no-one has known what the entire trees looked like.
Two years ago, two fossils were found near Gilboa of trees which had fallen sideways, with their trunk, branches, twigs and crown still intact.
American researchers called in Dr Christopher Berry of Cardiff University, an expert who has studied tree fossils around the world for the last 17 years. Dr Berry was able to identify the trunks as being of the genus Wattieza, a tree fern-like plant.

Source Cardiff University

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