* Astronomy

Members Login
Post Info TOPIC: Prehistoric caves


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Atapuerca caves
Permalink  
 


This picture released by Fundacion Atapeurca shows a human tooth found in the Atapuerca Sierra, near Burgos. Spanish researchers on Friday said they had unearthed a human tooth more than one million years old, which they estimated to be the oldest human fossil remain ever discovered in western Europe.

Attachments
__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

The fossilised human remains been unearthed near the town of Atapuerca, Burgos province, in the north of Spain.
The 1.2 million years old bones were found near to where several other finds had been discovered in recent years. In 1997, 800,000 years old human remains from Homo heidelbergensis were found, along with stone tools and weapons.

The latest discovery was by Rosa Huguet, who was working with Professor Jose Maria Bermudez de Castro.

Latitude: 42.371390N Longitude: 3.54722W

In a small hill east of Burgos, evidence of the presence and lifeways of prehistoric humanity is preserved, spanning the time from one million years ago to the present.
Throughout the centuries, many different human groups have lived and left their marks on the Sierra de Atapuerca, which at different times in its history has been a refuge, hunting ground, sanctuary, battleground, landmark, limestone quarry and, finally, archaeological site.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Giant panda ancestor
Permalink  
 


The giant panda's earliest known ancestor was much smaller than its modern-day counterpart, scientists say.
A fossilised skull found in south China revealed the ancient animal, known as Ailuropoda microta, was about half the size of today's giant panda.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Jinyin Cave
Permalink  
 


The first skull of the earliest known ancestor of the giant panda was been discovered in China. Discovery of the skull, estimated to be at least 2 million years old, is reported by Russell L. Ciochon in Tuesday's edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Ciochon, an anthropologist at the University of Iowa, and a team of U.S. and Chinese researchers, made the find in a limestone cave in south China.
The animal, formally known as Ailuropoda microta, or "pygmy giant panda," would have been about three feet long, compared to the modern giant panda, which averages in excess of five feet.
Previously this animal had been known only by a few teeth and bones, but a skull had never been found.
Judging by the wear patterns on its teeth it also lived on a diet of bamboo, the main food of the current giant panda.
Other than size, the animal was anatomically similar to today's giant panda.
The work was funded by the Chinese National Natural Science Foundation and University of Iowa.

This image released by the Institute of Vertebrate Palaeontology and Paleoanthropology in Beijing shows front views of a new fossil panda skull, Ailuropoda microta, from Jinyin Cave, Guangxi, China, left, and a living giant panda skull, Ailuropoda melanoleuca, right. The first skull of the earliest known ancestor of the giant panda has been discovered in China, researchers report. Discovery of the skull, estimated to be at least 2 million years old, is reported by Russell L. Ciochon in the Tuesday June 19, 2007 edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Credit  Institute of Vertebrate Palaeontology and Paleoanthropology, Beijing

See more

Attachments
__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Barabar caves
Permalink  
 


Cracks have developed in the Barabar caves dating back to the age of Ashoka the Great of Mauryan Empire in 3rd century BC.
Located in Jehanabad district, these caves were carved out of a huge piece of granite representing one of the earliest examples of rock-cut architecture in India. These were used by Jain monks as a retreat.
Following detection of the cracks, a worried Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) sent an SOS to Jehanabad DM requesting him to impose a ban on rock blasts in the nearby hilly region which may cause further damage by widening the gaps.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Lupercale
Permalink  
 


The story of Romulus and Remus is almost as old as Rome. The orphan twins were suckled by a she-wolf in a cave on the banks of the Tiber. Romulus grew up to found Rome in 753 B. C.
Historians have long since dismissed the story as a charming legend.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Cantal caves
Permalink  
 


The paintings in Spain's Cantal caves date back to 30,000 years ago and are the oldest in Spain, researcher Pedro Cantalejo said Wednesday at a press conference.
Cantalejo, who has spent 20 years in the Upper Palaeolithic caves, in Andalucia municipality Rincon de la Victoria, said the hunter-gatherers who painted Cantal's more than 200 paintings, began work 30,000 to 20,000 years ago, older than the famous cave paintings of Altamira in northern Spain as well as those of Lascaux in southwest France.
The caves were used again around 6,000 years ago, painted with human figures and used as a collective grave, in the late Neolithic and the Calcolithic.
Cantalejo's new book Prehistory in the Cantal Caves describes the cave as a cultural and religious cathedral, not just a refuge from daily life, adding that Rincon de Victoria may be founded because of these caves.
The Cantal caves are more than 2.5 km long and only 500 meters are open to the public. They were discovered in 1918 by an abbot, Henri Breval, but formal research began only in 1983.
Discovered in 1879 and 1940 respectively, the caves of Altamira and Lascaux contain magnificent specimens of Palaeolithic art.

Source

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Prehistoric caves
Permalink  
 


House buyers today usually peruse properties with a checklist of desired features in mind. This aspect of human behaviour has apparently not changed much over the millennia, according to a new study that found prehistoric cave dwellers in Britain did exactly the same thing when choosing their homes.
The recently released three-year-long survey of approximately 230 caves in the Yorkshire Dales and 190 caves in the northern England Peak District determined that people there from 4,000 to 2,000 B.C. selected caves based on at least five criteria.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Ajanta and Ellora caves
Permalink  
 


Faced with the contradictory choice of preserving and popularising the 2,200-year-old Ajanta and Ellora caves with their treasure trove of paintings, Mumbai's architect couple Trilochan and Anju Chhaya decided to do both.
Five kilometres away from the magnificent World Heritage monument, built over 800 years from 200 B.C. to 600 A.D. in the austere rocks near Aurangabad, Chhaya and Chhaya Design Consultants (CCDC) decided to create a 'prelude' to the caves.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Karaftu cave
Permalink  
 


Inhabited by the descendants of the Median Empire, the western Iranian province of Kurdistan is an ancient area within the country that is home to old and astonishing monuments.
There is a cave between the townships of Divandarreh and Saqqez that reveals Arsacid dynasty riches which predate the birth of Christ.
The Karaftu cave has an engraving in Latin on the opening wall with a stone script which literally reads, "Where Heracletus dwells the evil can not enter." The cave is said to have been a temple of the Grecian deity.

Read more

Latitude: 36.2858, Longitude: 46.8500 (Rough area)

__________________
«First  <  1 2 3 4 5 6  >  Last»  | Page of 6  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard