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Assistant geology professor collects meteorites in Antarctica

For the TCU community, February's five days of snow meant cancellation of school and inability to drive on slightly iced over roads, but for Rhiannon Mayne, a little bit of snow was nothing after spending eight weeks in Antarctica.
Mayne, assistant professor of geology, returned from collecting meteorites in Antarctica's negative 30 degree weather one day before Fort Worth's ice storm hit, she said.

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ANSMET Meteorite Hunters' season closing down, "Remember a meteorite is quite good at waiting"

The final days of the two ANSMET meteorite hunting teams have arrived. The Recon team who searched in areas near the South Pole reported to have found a total of 302 meteorites. Read on for the ANSMET scientists' trademark educational wrap-up on how to detect and hunt for meteorites.
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Antarctic meteorite adventure: Cruise with Aurora Expeditions on a choice of two meteorite retrieval expeditions, departing in February next year. The voyages are limited to 54 passengers who will be able to assist palaeontologist Paul Willis as he collects the 5kg meteorite he discovered on Seymour Island in 2008. The 12-day Weddell Sea Voyages are priced from $US6775, excluding flights, and include daily shore excursions and explorations using inflatable Zodiacs; scuba diving options are also available. More: 1800 637 688; auroraexpeditions.com.au.
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The Antarctic is a land well known for its other-worldly landscapes, but Twizel-based mountain guide Shaun Norman is on the ice as part of a mission to find something truly extraterrestrial - meteorites.
Mr Norman (67), an Antarctic veteran and internationally qualified mountain guide, is preparing for his fourth year as part of the Nasa and US National Science Foundation-funded Antarctic Search for Meteorites - known as Ansmet.

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ANSMET
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ANSMET hunting for meteorites again

This Antarctic season ANSMET has two field teams with separate goals hunting for meteorites; a smaller, more mobile team dedicated to exploring previously unvisited meteorite sites and based at the South Pole, and a larger team that conducts highly systematic searches on ice fields where they know there are many meteorites, based at the Davis Nunataks and Mount Ward.
The Fuchs Foundation Science teachers are back at Union Glacier. The Moon Regan Transantarctic vehicles are heading towards Union Glacier while collecting meteorites for ANSMET and the KNGS Arctic Trucks are nearing Novolazarevskaya.

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Searching for meteorites in Antarctica surely could rank as an experience of a lifetime.

Geologist Marta Corbin, 58, Whiteland, spent six weeks on the Antarctic ice doing just that, and she will present a lecture Saturday in the Johnson County Museum of History in Franklin about her experience.

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Basaltic achondritic micrometeorite
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Title: A unique basaltic micrometeorite expands the inventory of solar system planetary crusts
Authors: Matthieu Gounellea, Marc Chaussidonb, Alessandro Morbidellic, Jean-Alix Barratd, CÚcile Engrande, Michael E. Zolenskyf and Kevin D. McKeegan

Micrometeorites with diameter ~100-200 m dominate the flux of extraterrestrial matter on Earth. The vast majority of micrometeorites are chemically, mineralogically, and isotopically related to carbonaceous chondrites, which amount to only 2.5% of meteorite falls. Here, we report the discovery of the first basaltic micrometeorite (MM40). This micrometeorite is unlike any other basalt known in the solar system as revealed by isotopic data, mineral chemistry, and trace element abundances. The discovery of a new basaltic asteroidal surface expands the solar system inventory of planetary crusts and underlines the importance of micrometeorites for sampling the asteroids' surfaces in a way complementary to meteorites, mainly because they do not suffer dynamical biases as meteorites do. The parent asteroid of MM40 has undergone extensive metamorphism, which ended no earlier than 7.9 Myr after solar system formation. Numerical simulations of dust transport dynamics suggest that MM40 might originate from one of the recently discovered basaltic asteroids that are not members of the Vesta family. The ability to retrieve such a wealth of information from this tiny (a few micrograms) sample is auspicious some years before the launch of a Mars sample return mission.

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