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Despite his brief nine-year reign, Tutankhamen is probably the most famous pharaoh of ancient Egypt. Because his tomb had not been robbed at the time of its discovery in 1922, historians have been able to piece together aspects of the boy king's 19-year life. More than 100 walking sticks and "pharmacies" (medicinal seeds, fruits and leaves) found mingled among funeral offerings and other treasures within the tomb suggested that the pharaoh was frail, and two mummified fetuses implied that his offspring might have suffered from lethal genetic defects. But a new study on the Tutankhamen family mummies themselves, published February 16 in JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association , has provided biological insight into the king's incestuous royal lineage and his early death.
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The Egyptian 'boy king' Tutankhamun may well have died of malaria, experts say, after studying his mummified remains.
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Egypt will soon reveal the results of DNA tests made on the world's most famous ancient king, the young Pharaoh Tutankhamun, to answer lingering mysteries over his lineage, the antiquities department said Sunday.
Speaking at a conference, archaeology chief Zahi Hawass said he would announce the results of the DNA tests and the CAT scans on Feb. 17. The results will be compared to those made of King Amenhotep III, who may have been Tutankamun's grandfather.

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Egypt's King Tutankhamun's underground tomb is falling to ruin because of sweaty visitors.
The tomb of Tutankhamun - who is buried in the Valley of the Kings in Egypt - is suffering from the wear and tear caused by thousands of sweaty visitors who make a pilgrimage to the region each year, according to a Supreme Council of Antiquities report.

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The secrets of Tutankhamun's decaying tomb

Given the peace and quiet Tutankhamun enjoyed for three millennia, it has been a rough 87 years for him since he was discovered by Howard Carter in 1922. He was immediately relieved of his treasures; his tomb became one of the world's best-known tourist attractions, and finally, in 2005, his mummified corpse was hoiked out of its final resting-place to be studied by scientists.
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American scientists have been asked to study and preserve the most famous tomb in Egypt -- that of boy king Tutankhamen, who died more than 3,000 years ago.

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DNA test to discover Tutankhamun's parentage
Egyptian researchers are using DNA tests to discover the lineage of pharaoh king Tutankhamun, whose ancestry remains a mystery to Egyptologists, antiquities chief Zahi Hawass said last month.
The young king, whose mummy was found in a gold and turquoise sarcophagus by English archaeologist Howard Carter in 1922, ruled Egypt between 1333 and 1324 BC.

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Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs

There are also the expected treasures. Not seen in 1979 are a bracelet with the central image of a scarab and an inlaid pendant that contains a rare, yellow-green glass stone carved in the shape of a scarab beetle that some scientists now believe is a fragment from an ancient meteorite.
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A new generation of Northern Californians will have a chance to view the artefacts of Egypts best-known pharaoh when Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs opens at the de Young on June 27, 2009. This marks the first time in three decades that the treasures of King Tutankhamun will be seen in Northern California since the first record-breaking exhibition at the de Young in 1979.

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Two foetuses found buried with Tutankhamun may have been his twin daughters, an expert has claimed.
Professor Robert Connolly, an anatomist who is working with Egyptian authorities to analyse the tomb of the Egyptian Pharaoh, says that preliminary tests on the mummified remains of the two still-born babies indicate that Tutankhamun may have fathered them both. He will present the new findings at the Pharmacy and Medicine in Ancient Egypt Conference at the University of Manchester today

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