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Tomb NC2
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Work at the enigmatic tomb concealing the hidden entrance to Giza's lost cave-world has stepped up a gear as Dr Zahi Hawass, Secretary General of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities, reveals that the mysterious location is being probed by a host of experts.

"We have experts in all fields working with us. Archaeologists, geologists, engineers, and architects, to name a few."

Dr Hawass is, however, being tight lipped on exactly why there is so much interest in the tomb, designated "NC2".

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RE: Egyptian Tombs
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Fracture zones endanger tombs in Valley of Kings
Ancient choices made by Egyptians digging burial tombs may have led to today's problems with damage and curation of these precious archaeological treasures, but photography and detailed geological mapping should help curators protect the sites, according to a Penn State researcher.

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A storehouse of 30 Egyptians mummies has been unearthed inside a 2,600-year-old tomb, in a new round of excavations at the vast necropolis of Saqqara outside Cairo.
The tomb was located at the bottom of a 11-metre deep shaft, announced Egypt's top archaeologist Zahi Hawass and eight of the mummies were in sarcophagi, while the rest had been placed in niches along the wall.

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Queen Sesheshet
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Egypt's chief archaeologist has announced the discovery of a 4,300-year-old pyramid in Saqqara, the sprawling necropolis and burial site of the rulers of ancient Memphis.
The pyramid is said to belong to Queen Sesheshet, the mother of King Teti who was the founder of the 6th Dynasty of Egypt's Old Kingdom.
Egypt's antiquities chief Zahi Hawass made the announcement Tuesday at the site in Saqqara, about 12 miles south of Cairo.
Hawass' team has been excavating the site for two years. He says the discovery was only made two months ago when it became clear that the 16-foot-tall structure uncovered from the sand was a pyramid.

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RE: Egyptian Tombs
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Multinational Team Creates the First 3-D Model of Egypt's Oldest Pyramid
The first "Virtual Step Pyramid" is to be used by architects, restorers, and archaeologists as part of efforts to save and restore the Step Pyramid in the face of threats from centuries of erosion and the fragility of the stone and clay body of the pyramid, exposed after the protective outer casing was removed by stone robbers in ancient times.

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Sarcophagus of Menkaure
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It has been a source of enduring fascination for archaeologists and amateur Egyptologists everywhere: what exactly happened to the sarcophagus of Menkaure, one of Egypt's greatest Pharaohs? Now, more than 170 years after it was found and lost, the mystery could be solved.

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Imhotep
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The Saqqara Geophysical Survey Project may be on the verge of discovering the remains of Imhotep, the architect of the Step Pyramid.

"We've now found two large tombs where we think Imhotep could be. The largest tomb is around 90 metres long by 50 metres wide. The walls are more than five metres thick. The second tomb is next to it, and is about 70 metres long by 50 metres wide. It has a complicated internal structure which suggests a courtyard or temple. The tombs dwarf everything in the area. A person of Imhotep's importance could have commanded the artisans and labour needed to build his own tomb on this kind of scale. All the information we have points to this being the most probable place he could be" - Project Director Ian Mathieson.

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RE: Egyptian Tombs
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Archaeologists have discovered a well-preserved burial chamber in a necropolis in Egypt, which may contain the mummy of an ancient warrior.
Based on the coffin's inscriptions and pottery found near it, experts date the burial to the early reign of the 11th dynasty, which lasted from 2125 to 1985 B.C.

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Intact clay pots sealed with cartouches of King Tutankhamun and eight baskets have been discovered in his treasure room in the Valley of the Kings, the Egyptian Culture Minister said on Monday.

The 3,300-year-old find is highly surprising considering the vast number of visitors and researchers that have descended into the boy-pharaoh's tomb since British explorer Howard Carter discovered and broke into the treasure-packed burial place in the early 1920s.
Dr. Zahi Hawass, a world-famous Egyptologist who heads Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities, said his team of archaeologists had discovered baskets containing "large quantities of well-preserved doum [palm] fruits," and twenty pear-shaped vases bearing Tutankhamun's official seal.
The discovery is the second major find in three months for Hawass, who announced in June he had identified the mummy of Hatshepsut, Egypt's best-known female pharaoh and a descendant of Tutankhamun.
Hawass's team reportedly found the provisions, intended to accompany Tutankhamun into the afterlife, in a treasure chamber next to the room where the king's elaborate, multi-layered coffin was discovered. It remains unclear whether Howard Carter saw the items, but they are not listed in his reports on the tomb.

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Hatshepsut
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Egyptologists think they have identified the mummy of Hatshepsut, the most famous queen to rule ancient Egypt, found in a humble tomb in the Valley of the Kings.
Zahi Hawass, Egypt's chief archaeologist, will hold a news conference in Cairo tomorrow to announce what may be the most important find in the area since the discovery of King Tutankhamun.
An archaeologist, who asked not to be named, said the candidate for identification as the mummy of Hatshepsut was one of two females found in 1903 in a small tomb believed to be that of Hatshepsut's wetnurse, Sitre In.

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