* Astronomy

Members Login
Post Info
TOPIC: Ancient Settlements


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Ancient Settlements
Permalink  
 


Ancient city of Jericho marks 10,000 years

The ancient city of Jericho is literally older than history itself. Recorded history started in the 4th millennium BC with the advent of written language. By that time, Jericho had already existed as an ancient walled city for 4,000 years.
During its long 10,000 years, Jericho has seen much. If the city's ancient stones could talk, they would fill several libraries with their stories. Empires have come and gone, but still the ancient city of Jericho thrives as an oasis in a dry and arid region.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Bronze Age cities archaeologists say could be the precursor of Western civilisation are being uncovered in excavations on the Russian steppe.
Twenty of the spiral-shaped settlements, believed to be the original home of the Aryan people, have been identified, and there are about 50 more suspected sites. They all lie buried in a region more than 640km long near Russia's border with Kazakhstan.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Early Celts in Eastern France

Excavations of a hill fort located near one of the largest burial mounds in Eastern France have been carried out by an archaeologist from the University of Bristol. Among the many finds is a bronze brooch: a masterpiece of early Celtic art with a duck's head motif, its eyes inlaid with Mediterranean coral.
Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

The temple found in the Goliama Kosmatka mound dates back to the second half of the 5th century Bc. Few floral elements have been preserved on the marble door of its chamber. These ornaments symbolise the four directions and the life cycle. A unique gold garland was found in the very centre of the tomb, as well as a gold wine cup and military equipment. A bronze statue representing the head of king of king Seut III was ceremonially buried in front of the tomb.
Read more

Latitude: 42.689730N  Longitude: 25.351059E

Thracian Tomb of Kazanlak


__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Mount in Southern Bulgaria might hold Thracian king Seuthes residence: archaeologist

Ivan Hristov, deputy director of the National Museum of History, suggests the residence of the Thracian king Seuthes might have been at the mount of Kozi Gramadi, close to the southern village of Starosel. The exploration of the site resumes on July 1.
Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

It was an age when reindeer roamed the Scottish landscape, competing for territory with human raiding parties from what is now the North Sea.
The country lay under glaciers as far south as the Highland Line, and a mini ice-age was fast approaching.
Today, for the first time, Scottish archaeologists will tell the story of this remarkable period at a national conference in Glasgow.
Alan Saville, of National Museums Scotland, will join archaeologist Tam Ward to discuss ongoing work at Howburn Farm, an ancient human campsite discovered by amateur enthusiasts in 2005. The discovery, north of Biggar, is the oldest so far found, and proves that humans lived in Scotland as long as 14,000 years ago.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Tell Zeidan
Permalink  
 


A team of archaeologists from the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute has joined a team of Syrian colleagues in excavating a key site from the prehistoric society that formed the foundation of urban life in the ancient Middle East.
The site already has yielded evidence of trade in obsidian, rich agricultural production and the development of copper processing - all of which flourished long before people domesticated pack animals for transportation or invented the wheel. The early culture also spawned a social elite that engaged in trade with far-flung regions and used stone seals to mark ownership of goods.
The American and Syrian archaeologists are digging at the long-known, but previously unexcavated mound of Tell Zeidan, which is one of the largest sites of the Ubaid culture in northern Mesopotamia. Tell Zeidan dates from between 6000 and 4000 B.C. and is expected to shed much light on the Ubaid period (about 5300-4000 B.C.), which immediately preceded the world's first urban civilizations in the ancient Middle East.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Archaeologists Uncover Land Before Wheel; Site Untouched for 6,000 Years

A team of archaeologists from the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute, along with a team of Syrian colleagues, is uncovering new clues about a prehistoric society that formed the foundation of urban life in the Middle East prior to invention of the wheel.
The mound of Tell Zeidan in the Euphrates River Valley near Raqqa, Syria, which had not been built upon or excavated for 6,000 years, is revealing a society rich in trade, copper metallurgy and pottery production.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Ancient Settlements
Permalink  
 


188 houses from Neolithic era unearthed in Middle Euphrates Region

Tal Bokrous is a sample of the first agricultural village built according to the architectural style of the Stone Age in Deir Ezzor, (432 kms northeast of Damascus, Syria).
The site is the only archaeological discovery at the Middle Euphrates Region which belongs to the booming phase of the Neolithic era.
The Neolithic era (New Stone Age), was a period in the development of human technology, beginning about 9500 BC in the Middle East that is traditionally considered the last part of the Stone Age.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Some of the archaeological remnants relating to medieval Assam, which have survived for centuries, are now facing threat from a quarter of land encroachers in Betioni GP area of Khumtai LAC. One of such examples is the large campus dedicated to Mumai Tamuly Barbaruah alias Sukuti, the first man to hold the post of Barbaruah (like that of the present post of the Commissioner of Upper Assam) during the reign of Susengpha Pratap Singha (1603-1641 AD), and the father of great hero Lachit Barphukan, whose village organisation skill and societal bonding had been adored by many eminent historians including Sir Edward Gait. The campus has been completely encroached by a political leader of the ruling party to open a tea garden on the plot. There is a quadrangular road surrounded by land barricade (bordhap), in the plot.
Read more

__________________
«First  <  1 2 3 413  >  Last»  | Page of 13  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard