* Astronomy

Members Login
Post Info
TOPIC: Hydrothermal Vents


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Hydrothermal Vents
Permalink  
 


Chinese maritime experts discover liquid sulphides areas

A team of Chinese scientists claimed to have discovered five hot liquid sulphides areas known as "black chimneys" that could provide clues to study the origins of life after an expedition to the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans.
Chief scientist for maritime exploration, Tao Chunhui, told the state-run CCTV that his team has discovered five new hot liquid sulphides areas -- two in the Atlantic Ocean, two in the Pacific Ocean and one in the Indian Ocean.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Scientists Locate Apparent Hydrothermal Vents off Antarctica

Scientists at Columbia's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory have found evidence of hydrothermal vents on the seafloor near Antarctica, formerly a blank spot on the map for researchers wanting to learn more about seafloor formation and the bizarre life forms drawn to these extreme environments.
Hydrothermal vents spew volcanically heated seawater from the planet's underwater mountain ranges - the vast mid-ocean ridge system, where lava erupts and new crust forms. Chemicals dissolved in those vents influence ocean chemistry and sustain a complex web of organisms, much as sunlight does on land. In recent decades more than 220 vents have been discovered worldwide, but so far no one has looked for them in the rough and frigid waters off Antarctica.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Deepest volcanic vents discovered

What are believed to be the world's deepest undersea volcanic vents have been discovered in the Caribbean.
The vents, known as black smokers, were located 5,000m down in the Cayman Trough.
The volcanic chimneys, which spew out water hot enough to melt lead, were caught on film by a British-led team.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Cayman Trough
Permalink  
 


Beneath the Caribbean Sea a remotely controlled vehicle came upon the world's deepest hydrothermal vents, where super-heated mineral-rich water gushes from chimney structures onto the ocean floor.
The black smokers, named for how they spew out an iron sulphide compound that's black, sit 5 kilometres deep in the Cayman Trough in the Caribbean. While black smokers are the hottest of the undersea vents, white smokers are cooler and often contain compounds that are white in colour.
Until now, the deepest known vents had been found some 4.2 km below the sea surface.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Expedition to World's Deepest Undersea Volcanoes

A British scientific expedition is heading into the world's deepest volcanic rift, more than three miles beneath the waves in the Caribbean, to hunt for the deepest "black smoker" vents detected so far on the ocean floor. The team, working aboard the Royal Research Ship James Cook, will use a robot submarine called Autosub6000 and a remotely-controlled deep-sea vehicle called HyBIS to reveal the features and inhabitants of the world's undersea volcanoes for the first time.
The expedition is being run by Drs Doug Connelly, Jon Copley, Bramley Murton, Kate Stansfield and Professor Paul Tyler, all from the National Oceanography Centre in Southampton, UK. They will explore the Cayman Trough - a rift in the seafloor of the Caribbean that reaches more than three miles deep. In November last year, a US-led survey of the waters of the Cayman Trough detected signs of deep-sea vents on the ocean floor below - and now the British expedition is heading out to investigate them.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Origin of Life
Permalink  
 


In finding answers to the mystery of the origin of life, scientists may not have to dig too deep. New research is shedding light on shallower waters as a possible location for where life on Earth began.
Hydrothermal vents have been a focus of origin of life studies ever since the first one was discovered in 1977. These were mainly deep vents that averaged 2,100 metres down on the ocean floor. The hot gasses emanating from the center of the Earth through these vents could reach temperatures greater than 300 degrees Celsius.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Pyrococcus CH1
Permalink  
 


Wonder what life of Jupiter's moon, Europa, might look like? Checkout a  new species of archaebacteria, Pyrococcus CH1,discovered thriving on a mid-Atlantic ridge within a temperature range of 80 to 105°C and able to divide itself up to a hydrostatic pressure of 120 Mpa (1000 times higher than the atmospheric pressure). Alieve won't help down there.
This discovery was made by the microbiologists of the Microbiology of Extreme Environments Laboratory in partnership with the Institute of Oceanography of Xiamen (China) and the Earth Science Laboratory. This archaebacteria had been isolated from samples of the "Serpentine" cruise, during which a Franco-Russian team explored the mid-Atlantic ridge for six weeks searching for new hydrothermal vents.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Hydrothermal Vents
Permalink  
 


At the dark bottom of our cool oceans, 85 percent of the earth's volcanic eruptions proceed virtually unnoticed. Though unseen, they are hardly insignificant. Submarine volcanoes generate the solid underpinnings of all the world's oceans massive slabs of rock seven kilometres thick.
Geophysicists first began to appreciate the smouldering origins of the land under the sea, known formally as ocean crust, in the early 1960s.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Underwater exploration of underwater geysers
Two Waikato University scientists are on a US expedition to study under water geysers hypothermal vents that spurt out super-heated, mineral-rich water and all manner of marine life.
Professor Craig Cary, a professor in biology at Waikato is chief scientist and leading investigator on the 55 crew expedition thats studying deep sea hypothermal vents in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. Joining Prof Cary from Waikato is Dr Conrad Pilditch, a benthic (mud/soft sediment) ecologist.

Read more

__________________
«First  <  1 2 3 4  >  Last»  | Page of 4  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard