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Oldest wooden anchor
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The world's oldest wooden anchor was discovered during excavations in the Turkish port city of Urla, the ancient site of Liman Tepe / the Greek 1st Millennium BCE colony of Klazomenai, by researchers from the Leon Recanati Institute for Maritime Studies of the University of Haifa. The anchor, from the end of the 7th century BC, was found near a submerged construction, imbedded approximately.1.5 meters underground.
The cooperative project between the University of Haifa and Ankara University sparked local interest, not only in marine archaeology, but also in the team of Israeli archaeologists. Israeli-Turkish relations have had their ups and downs over the past few years, but the cooperation between the Institute for Marine Studies at the University of Haifa and Ankara University has continually strengthened. In 2000, Prof. Hayat Erkanal of Ankara University invited Prof. Michal Artzy and scholars from the University of Haifa to join them in archaeological excavations in the port of Urla, a port city located near Izmir, with more than 5,000 years of maritime history. Remnants of an ancient port were uncovered during the excavations.

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Uluburun II
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Journey from Foça to Marseille.. A group, who built the replica of ships used by old Foça people 2,600 year ago, will set to sail next year. The voyage will last two months.
 The 360 Degree Research Group, which had built the replica of the oldest known shipwreck, Uluburun II, is now getting ready to initiate a new project anticipating a voyage from Phokaia (modern Foça) to the Marseille via two replica ancient ships.

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Iron Age boat
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A 2,000-year-old log boat discovered buried in mud is to be put on display after a 10-year restoration project. The Iron Age vessel was found in 1964 during dredging work in Poole Harbour (Dorset, England) and members of York Archaeological Trust restored the water-logged timber.
The log boat, which is thought to have been used for continental trade, is estimated to have weighed 14 tonnes. A glass case has been designed to house the ancient timber, which is due to be displayed in Poole museum in June. The final cleaning of the vessel has been scheduled to finish this month.
The log boat, which carried up to 18 people, would have been based at Green Island in the harbour. After it was found it was kept submerged in water for 30 years while archaeologists decided what to do with it. As part of the conservation project, the boat has spent a decade soaked in a sugar solution before being dried out at Poole's Scalpel's Court museum.

Source: BBC News

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RE: Bronze Age boat
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Cyprus’ reputation as an archaeological gold mine has been given another boost, with an important underwater Bronze Age discovery.
A team of maritime archaeologists from the UK has uncovered 120 stone anchors off the coast of Paphos. The anchors, some of which date back to the Bronze Age (2500-1125BC), are the second largest collection in the eastern Mediterranean.

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Milford Haven boat
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A priceless Bronze Age canoe discovered during work on a gas pipeline sped down a busy motorway yesterday into the 21st century.
Up to 3,400 years since its last journey, the ancient artefact, unearthed this summer, was lifted into the modern world.
Stonehenge was in its infancy when the one tonne dug-out canoe, or cooking trough, hewn from a single trunk of oak, last saw light of day.
Yesterday, it was gently lifted from the site where it was discovered, near Milford Haven, west Wales, and put on to a lorry.
Stored in a specially-made crate it was then taken on a three-hour journey to Newport to undergo expert investigation.

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L

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Bronze Age Canoe
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Archaeologists working on a gas pipeline near Milford Haven in Pembrokeshire (Wales) have unearthed what they believe to be a 3,400-year-old canoe. Work has stopped on a section of the pipeline near St Botolphs to allow the Bronze Age oak relic to be recovered. It is the first such discovery in Wales and only 150 exist across Europe.

"You could never have expected to find anything like this in this small wetland area, it's just awesome" - Neil Fairburn, Senior archaeologist.

The team has also found evidence of a small settlement, a small amount of property and other items, such as polished stone rings.
It was found six weeks ago less than a metre below the surface in a marshy area of land, but archaeologists have only just had it confirmed what the find was. Work was stopped immediately. A fragment was sent to experts in Miami, who radio carbon dated it to 1,420 BCE. The canoe is carved from a single trunk of oak, and measures 4.5m x 0.9m. It is being kept continuously wet to prevent it from rotting.

"The wet conditions have provided beautiful preservation conditions for the wood. If the gas pipeline had not been coming through here we would not have this" - Neil Fairburn.

It will take another two weeks before the team is ready to move the canoe, which will be handed over to the National Museum of Wales. Contractors have been moved to work on other parts of the route, which will run the breadth of Wales.

Source BBC News

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RE: Bronze Age boat
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A remarkable find recovered from the River Tay (Perthshire, Scotland) is undergoing the first stages of a painstaking preservation process. In the culmination of a meticulous rescue plan, already reported last 30 July, the 3000-year-old log boat was dug from its watery resting place over recent weeks before being floated and towed into Newburgh harbour on 11 August.
With great care the boat, which was carved from a single oak, was lifted from the water by crane, an operation greeted with cheers and applause by a 100-strong crowd.

"This is among the oldest and best-preserved vessels of its kind ever found in Scotland, and we are sending it to the National Museum in Edinburgh where freeze-drying techniques will be used to preserve it intact" - David Strachan of the Perth and Kinross Heritage Trust, which ran the operation.

The 30-foot bronze age log boat, excavated from mudflats near Abernethy, has caused tremendous excitement in archaeological circles because of its age and state of preservation. It was found preserved in the mudflats of the Tay six years ago. The discovery captured the imagination of the public. Crowds closely followed the excavation, which took place during the short low-tide windows.

Source The Courier

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Carpow boat
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In ancient times, when Scotland was virtually covered in dense forest, there was only one way to get around. Travelling by boat helped early Scots to find food and trade goods with their neighbours.

Now, with the excavation of a 3,000-year-old log boat, archaeologists are hoping to learn more about how prehistoric Scots used the vast network of rivers and lochs.
The Bronze Age dug-out was found in mudflats at Carpow, on the south side of the River Tay estuary, in autumn 2001. A group of three amateur archaeologists – Scott McGuckin, Martin Brooks and Robert Fotheringham – had spotted the worn but still recognisable prow of boat sticking out from the mud and peat.
Radio carbon tests conducted later dated the 30-foot-long log boat, which had been carved out of a single piece of oak, to around 1000BC. This means the Carpow boat is the second-oldest dated log boat ever found in Scotland, and it is also one of the best preserved.
While the remains of 30 log boats survive today – the oldest was a stern portion of a log boat, carbon dated to 1800BC found in Dumfriesshire in 1973 – most are in extremely poor condition. The Carpow boat is not only still in one piece but it also has an intact transom board at the stern.

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RE: Bronze Age boat
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One of the oldest boats discovered in Scotland is being excavated and raised from its site in the Tay Estuary.

The Carpow log boat, as it is known, situated near Abernethy, was discovered in 2000. Identifying it as a log boat, used for fishing and wildfowling, Perth and Kinross Heritage Trust radiocarbon dated it to 1000BC - the late Bronze Age.

"It was discovered in 2000 by a metal detectorist – half of it was sticking out of the mud. The buried portion of it was very well preserved with intact transom boards [stern timbers], but the exposed part is deteriorating" - Archaeologist David Strachan of the Kinross Heritage Trust.

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Archaeologists in Perthshire will attempt to raise a Bronze Age boat from below the River Tay next month after undertaking excavation work yesterday.

The 3,000-year-old log boat was found by a man with a metal detector on the mudflats near Abernethy, six years ago.
The find was reported to Perth and Kinross Heritage Trust, which has since carried out a series of studies of the vessel, which is visible at low tides.
Radiocarbon dating tests revealed the 30ft boat, which was carved from a single piece of oak, is one of the oldest found in Scotland.
It is thought the vessel was used by hunters to catch fish or to transport goods or people.
The boat's stern has been well-preserved by the mudflats but it was sandbagged to prevent further deterioration caused by the rise and fall of the water.
Archaeologists are now keen to raise the vessel to allow conservation work to be carried out.
A team from the Heritage Trust carried out excavation work yesterday, digging a hole beneath the vessel and uncovering its full length for the first time.
They hope to be able to raise the vessel next month using a special cradle when tidal conditions are suitable.
The boat will then be taken on a flat-bed lorry to the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh for conservation work, to make the boat stable enough to go on display at the museum.
The painstaking project is expected to take around three years.

"The exposed parts of the boat are eroding quite rapidly and in order to tell us more about her, we want to raise her. It can be difficult because we have to work in tidal windows." - David Strachan, Archaeologist.

Six log boats were discovered in the Tay in the 19th century but only one of those has been preserved.
The oak boat, which dates from about 500AD, is on display at Dundee Museum.

Source P & J

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