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Mako shark
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An oil rig worker has filmed a "killer" Mako shark 200 miles off the Aberdeen coast.
Lance Baldwin, from Keith, who is a rig safety worker, filmed the predatory shark with a remote-controlled underwater video camera.

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RE: Great White Shark
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Most of Mississippi once sat below an ocean, and shark teeth and other aquatic fossils are buried below the state's soil.
The Jackson metro area straddles deposits of fossils from two different epochs - Eocene and Oligothene. Younger fossils of the Oligothene are found in the Byram, Cleary, Florence and Clinton areas.
The older, Eocene fossils are found in downtown Jackson and Madison County.

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Megalodon
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The great white shark may have awesome jaws but they are nothing compared with those of megalodon, its gigantic, whale-eating ancestor.
A new study of the extinct creature's skull shows it had an almighty bite, making the prehistoric fish one of the most fearsome predators of all time.

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Shark tooth
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A shark tooth is being examined by experts after a Roman quarry excavation.
Dr Charlie Underwood, from Birkbeck College in London, is among the experts who believe that the fossil, which was found at Barrington quarry, means the site may have originally been located off the North East cost of America millions of years ago.

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Megalodon shark
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Congratulations to David Wentz. The 16-year-old Port Huron resident has made a contribution to our knowledge of the ancient past.
David found a fossilised shark tooth last August while snorkelling in the St. Clair River off Marysville Beach. It turns out the tooth is from an extinct species of shark called Carcharodon megladon that is believed to have disappeared 2 million years ago.

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RE: Great White Shark
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A typical adult Great White Shark measures 4 to 4.8 metres (13 to 16 ft) with a typical weight of 680 to 1,100 kilograms (1,500 to 2,450 lbs), females generally being larger than males. The maximum size of the Great White Shark has been subject to much debate, conjecture, and misinformation. Richard Ellis and John E. McCosker, both academic shark experts, devote a full chapter in their book, The Great White Shark (1991), to analysing various accounts of extreme size.
Today, most experts contend that the Great White Shark's "normal" maximum size is about 6 metres (20 ft), with a "normal" maximum weight of about 1,900 kilograms (4,200 lb).



For several decades, many ichthyological works, as well as the Guinness Book of World Records, listed two great white sharks as the largest individuals caught: an 11 metre (36 ft) great white captured in South Australian waters near Port Fairy in the 1870s, and an 11.3 metre (37.6 ft) shark trapped in a herring weir in New Brunswick, Canada in the 1930s. While this was the commonly accepted maximum size, reports of 7.5 to 10 metre (25 to 33.3 ft) Great White Sharks were common and often deemed credible.

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Megalodon shark
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A day at the beach led to an exciting discovery for a Palm Harbor boy who found something belonging to a species that became extinct many years ago: the tooth of a megalodon shark.

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RE: Great White Shark
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NZ great white shark swims to Great Barrier Reef; sets new distance record.
A 4.4 metre female great white shark has set a new distance record for a New Zealand shark by swimming over 3000km to the tropical waters of the southern Great Barrier Reef, Australia. The shark, nicknamed Kerri, has provided the first evidence that New Zealand great whites do in fact travel to Australia.

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An enormous thresher shark nearly twice as heavy as the previous largest known specimen has been caught off the coast of Cornwall.
Roger Nowell, a trawler fisherman, caught the 16ft (5m) shark which, at 1,250lb (568kg), is much larger than the previous record-holder, a 723lb (329kb) specimen caught by rod off Hawaii in 2005.

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Large sharks and whales are being regularly encountered along the Cornish coast. That is the early conclusion of a new marine wildlife survey, co-ordinated by a scientist based at the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton.
SeaWatch SW, which started in mid-July, is designed to monitor endangered marine animals. It is already highlighting the spectacular array of sharks, whales, dolphins and seabirds living around our coast, with large numbers of harmless giant basking sharks - as well as minke whales, common dolphins, harbour porpoises, ocean sunfish, and even a predatory blue shark - being recorded from the shore.

The 2007 SeaWatch SW survey continues until mid-October, and daily sightings and photos taken from the watchpoint can be found on the project website at: http://www.seawatch-sw.org.

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