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TOPIC: Ancient Marine Reptiles


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Plesiosaur
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The remains of a real sea monster has been found overlooking the Belle Fourche Reservoir at Orman Dam by local palaeontologist Walter Stein.
Stein, who moved to Belle Fourche to begin a career as an independent paleontologist after working for other paleontological firms, recently issued a news release on Doc, the plesiosaur.

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RE: Ancient Marine Reptiles
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An Iranian research team has found dinosaur fossils thought to be 100 million years old in the heights of Mashhad's Kallat region.
The rib and vertebra fossils were found by the Mashhad Open University research team and have been sent to Germany for detailed examination.
German scientists believe the fossils are the remains of a breed of plesiosaurus, an aquatic reptile that thrived during the early part of the Jurassic Period and which cruised the deep seas.

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Guarinisuchus munizi
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Brazilian palaeontologists discover the fossil of a new marine crocodile species in the country's northeastern coastal area, Mina Poty. Named Guarinisuchus munizi, the fossil includes the skull, jaw and vertebrae and is said to be the most complete of its kind to be discovered in South America.
The 62-million-year-old fossil is part of the Dyrosauridae group, which replaced the serpentine marine lizards called mosasaurs as the dominant Palaeocene marine predators.

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RE: Ancient Marine Reptiles
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One of the oldest and most complete plesiosaur fossils recovered in North America, and the oldest yet discovered from the Cretaceous Period, represents a new genus of the prehistoric aquatic predator according to University of Calgary palaeontologists who have formally described the creature after its remains were uncovered in a Syncrude Canada Ltd. mine near Fort McMurray in 1994.
In a paper published in the current issue of the German research journal Palaeontographica Abteilung A, former University of Calgary graduate student Patrick Druckenmiller and biological sciences professor Anthony Russell have named the 2.6-metre-long plesiosaur Nichollsia borealis in memory of the late Elizabeth (Betsy) Nicholls. Nicholls was a renowned palaeontologist and U of C alumna who is credited with transforming the understanding of prehistoric ocean life by describing the largest-ever marine reptile, a 23-metre-long ichthyosaur, discovered in northern British Columbia in 1999.

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A fossilised "sea monster" unearthed on an Arctic island is the largest marine reptile known to science, Norwegian scientists have announced.
The 150 million-year-old specimen was found on Spitspergen, in the Arctic island chain of Svalbard in 2006.
The Jurassic-era leviathan is one of 40 sea reptiles from a fossil "treasure trove" uncovered on the island.

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A fossil hunter is claiming to have found the bones of a Loch Ness monster in a quarry on the outskirts of Peterborough.
Eighteen-year-old Jamie Jordan, nicknamed the Fossil Kid, made the exciting discovery in a hunt around the disused quarries in Yaxley.
And Jamie, of Canwell, Werrington, Peterborough, was amazed to also find the bones of a younger creature just 25 feet below the ground.
After months of studying with a palaeontologist, the bigger bones have been confirmed as those of a Plesiosaur one of the first kinds of extinct animal known to science, which resemble Nessie, the Loch Ness Monster.

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Pliosaur
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 Norwegian researchers have discovered a second rare fossil in the Arctic of a pliosaur, a giant reptile described by experts as the "T-Rex of the oceans", the project leader said Tuesday.

"We think it is a species unknown until now. Our pliosaur shows significant differences from those discovered in France and Britain" - Joern Hurum of Oslo University's palaeontology department told AFP.

The fossil, including parts of the skull, was discovered during a dig this past summer in the Svalbard archipelago, about 1,000 kilometres  from the North Pole.
The bones were found near those of a first pliosaur fossil found a year earlier.

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RE: Ancient Marine Reptiles
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Remains of a bus-sized prehistoric "monster" reptile found on a remote Arctic island may be a new species never before recorded by science.
Initial excavation of a site on the Svalbard islands in August yielded the remains, teeth, skull fragments and vertebrae of a reptile estimated to measure nearly 40 feet long.

"It seems the monster is a new species" Joern Harald Hurum of the University of Oslo.

The reptile appears be the same species as another sea predator whose remains were found nearby on Svalbard last year. His team described those 150-million-year-old remains as belonging to a short-necked plesiosaur measuring more than 30 feet - "as long as a bus ... with teeth larger than cucumbers."
The short-necked plesiosaur was a voracious reptile often compared to the Tyrannosaurus rex of the oceans.
Mark Evans, a plesiosaur expert at the Leicester City Museums in Britain, said he not know enough about the Norwegian find to comment on it specifically. But he said new types of the sea reptiles are being found regularly.

"We are regularly seeing new species of plesiosaurs popping up - in a way because, in the past 10 or 15 years, there has been what we call a renaissance in plesiosaur research" - Mark Evans.

Hurum said the team had only managed to excavate a 3-meter area of the find. The Norwegian-led team plans to present more detailed findings early next year, and return to Svalbard, 300 miles north of Norway's mainland, to excavate further next year.

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Visitors in the lobby of the National Geographic Theatre will see a large prehistoric sea creature swimming in the air overhead.
It's the reconstructed cast of a four-metre mosasaur, which resembles a spiny monitor lizard, that was discovered on Courtenay's Puntledge River in 1991.
Beneath it, display cases show ammonites and crabs that lived in the waters off Vancouver Island and the Queen Charlotte Islands 75 million to 85 million years ago.

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Plesiosaurs
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The fossil of a prehistoric sea monster that lived more than 144 million years ago has been found in a river on the edge of west Belfast.
Colin Glen could become known as Northern Ireland's Jurassic Park after the backbone of a plesiosaur was uncovered.
Such a find was a chance in a million said Paul Bennett, the educational ranger at the park.

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