* Astronomy

Members Login
Post Info
TOPIC: Chang'e Lunar Satellite


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Chang'e Lunar Satellite
Permalink  
 


China will release over 700 hours of data sent back by the Chang'e-1 satellite to domestic authorised users and the European Space Agency, according to the State Administration of Science Technology and Industry for National Defence (SASTIND) on Friday.

Source Xinhuanet

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Chang'e-1 lunar orbiter
Permalink  
 


The  Chang'e-1  lunar orbiter has successfully survived the Earth eclipsing the Sun,  and blocking  its supply of solar energy.  
From about 10 a.m., the satellite was  hidden from direct sunlight and lost the contact from the Earth for about four hours; the orbiter returning to the sunlight and  resumed contact at about 2:10 p.m.
During the eclipse the satellite managed to  lose only 40 percent of its power storage.
According to  Ye Peijian, chief commander and designer in charge of the satellite system, the control centre had raised the orbit of the satellite to shortened the time it was not in direct sunlight by almost one hour and a half.

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Chang'e Lunar Satellite
Permalink  
 


According to Chinese officials ,  the  Chang'e-1 lunar probe has successfully captured pictures of the moon's polar  regions.
The Chinese Commission of Science, Technology and Industry for National Defence released  a picture of the moon's polar areas, on Thursday.
Ground controllers on January  4 adjusted  the  camera  aboard the satellite so that it could image  areas above 70 degrees north or south latitude.    This allowed the  first-ever  picture of those regions  on the moon to be taken.

"We have obtained good quality pictures" - spokesman Pei Zhaoyu,  China National Space Administration (CNSA).

The probe also raised  its orbit by nearly two kilometres on Sunday night to avoid a power shortage during a moon eclipse on Feb. 21.

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Long March 3A Rocket Body
Permalink  
 


A Long March 3A Rocket Body that was launched for the Chang'e-1 Mission on the 24th October 2007, from the Xichang Satellite Launch Centre, re-entered the earths atmosphere on the 28th January, 2008 @ 23:56 UTC ± 1 minute.

Long March 3A
Expand (64KB, 630 X 390)

Predicted Decay Location 26° S, 249° E
Inclination 30.6°
Revolution Number 160

TLE Data
CZ-3A R/B
1 32274U 07051B   08028.79891460  .18686109 -15265-4  10000-3 0   801
2 32274 030.5412 141.7374 1802179 229.7080 113.9717 12.44999392  1583
1 32274U 07051B   08028.79783013  .09125165 -14274-4  10000-3 0   792
2 32274 030.4821 141.8831 1779491 229.7530 108.4734 12.46950533  1589
1 32274U 07051B   08028.41475507  .04458972 -94296-5  10000-3 0   789
2 32274 030.6755 142.8255 3153727 226.4568 102.6941 09.47189462  1547
1 32274U 07051B   08028.40781611  .04455739 -94268-5  10000-3 0   770
2 32274 030.6755 142.8442 3154017 226.4275 079.0342 09.47126944  1541
1 32274U 07051B   08026.80450141 -.05160154  21915-4 -10485-2 0   762
2 32274 030.5662 145.2576 6256536 221.7624 350.5774 03.81843557  1487



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Chang'e Lunar Satellite
Permalink  
 


According to the Beijing Space Flight Control Centre, on the 28th, Chang'e-1's satellite Data show that everything is working perfectly and that the satellite is  orbiting  200 km above the Moon..
Tracking data from Chang'e-1 have revealed that the Moon is a very irregular sphere.
Director Tang Ge, from  the Beijing Space Flight Control Centre, said that they have discovered different gravitational pulls at  different locations of the Moon.

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

According to the China National Space Administration (CNSA) the Chang'e-1 lunar orbiter has started imaging the dark side of the moon.

changeDarkage1
This undated press release image composition was released on Dec. 11, 2007 and shows a crater named after Wan Hu a Chinese astronomer.
Credit Xinhua

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
New Crater
Permalink  
 


Some dogged sleuthing by a fellow space blogger has tracked down the truth behind the controversial first photo from China's moon orbiter.
In the week since the picture was released amid much fanfare in Beijing, there have been widespread rumours that the photo was a fake, copied from an old picture collected by a U.S. space probe.
The good news for the Chinese is that Planetary Society blogger Emily Lakdawalla's clears them of outright fakery. The bad news is, she found evidence that the photo was badly retouched for public release....
Lakdawalla found that a mistake was apparently made in stitching together the 19 strips of imagery to produce the finished picture - and that Chinese officials unknowingly pointed out that mistake as they defended the photo's veracity.

Read more

Ed ~ The new crater was always in doubt because it was not bright enough.

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

newCrater1
China's lunar probe pictures taken last week, left, and the 2005 NASA pictures, right. The extra hole in the Chinese pictures could suggest it was hit by an extra meteorite.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Chang'e Lunar Satellite
Permalink  
 


A leading scientist with China's lunar exploration program says the first lunar image taken by the country's first lunar orbiter, Chang'e-One, is indeed authentic.
Ouyang Ziyuan was responding to rumours spread by Chinese netizens who say the lunar image released last week copied a picture released by the US in 2005

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

According to Ouyang Ziyuan, a  leading scientist in the Chang'e program,  scientists and astronomy enthusiasts from all over the China all have free access to data sent back from China's first lunar orbiter Chang'e I.

"The money used for the Chang'e project comes from the taxpayers and, therefore, the data should also be made public. Any scientist or astronomy lover can apply to the state in accordance with certain procedures to obtain data he needs"

Ouyang Ziyuan, professor at the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and chief scientist of the lunar exploration program, said  that  the scientific instruments on board Chang'e I  are all operating and  currently sending back 3 trillion of data per second. The total data volume will reach 28 Terabytes  next year.(1 Terabyte is equivalent to 1,000 Gigabytes)

Source China Daily

__________________
«First  <  1 2 3 46  >  Last»  | Page of 6  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard