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Kings Cliffe Nuclear Waste Dump
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Plans for low-level radioactive waste disposal to be allowed at a landfill site in Northamptonshire have been given the go-ahead by the government.
The decision for Kings Cliffe near Peterborough follows a two-year stand-off between the hazardous waste company Augean and campaigners.

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Nuclear Waste
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The Russian military allegedly dumped nuclear waste into the Baltic Sea in the early 1990s, according to a report on Swedish television.
Radioactive material from a military base in Latvia is thought to have been thrown into Swedish waters.
For many the biggest shock is that the Swedish government may have known at the time and done nothing about it.

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Title: Selective incarceration of caesium ions by Venus flytrap action of a flexible framework sulphide
Authors: Nan Ding & Mercouri G. Kanatzidis

The selective capture of Cs+ from solution is relevant to the remediation of nuclear waste and remains a significant challenge. Here we describe a new framework composed of [(CH3)2NH2]+ and [Ga2Sb2S7]2- layers, which are perforated with holes. Shape selectivity couples with framework flexibility, allowing the compound to respond to the ion-exchange process. The size, shape and flexibility of the holes allow Cs+ ions in an aqueous solution to selectively pass through and enter the material via an ion-exchange process. Following capture, the structure dynamically closes its holes in a manner reminiscent of a Venus flytrap, which prevents the Cs+ ions from leaching out. This process has useful implications in the separation science of Cs as it relates to the clean-up of nuclear waste. The dynamic response we describe here provides important insights for designing new materials for the selective removal of difficult-to-capture ions.

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RE: Nuclear Waste Vault
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Finland's Nuclear Waste Solution
Here on Olkiluoto Island, the forest is king. Elk and deer graze near sun-dappled rivers and shimmering streams, and humans search out blueberries and chanterelle mushrooms. Weathered red farmhouses sit along sleepy dirt roads in fields abutting the woods. Far beneath the vivid green forest, deep in the bedrock, workers are digging the labyrinthine passages and chambers that they hope to someday pack with all of Finlands spent nuclear fuel.

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Date:
Nuclear Waste
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Earliest weapons-grade plutonium found in US dump
An old glass jar inside a beaten up old safe at the bottom of a waste pit may seem an unlikely place to find a pivotal piece of 20th century history. But that's just where the first batch of weapons-grade plutonium ever made has been found - abandoned at the world's oldest nuclear processing site.
The potentially dangerous find was made at Hanford, Washington State, the site of a nuclear reservation, established in 1943 to support the US's pioneering nuclear weapons program.

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RE: Nuclear Waste Vault
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The UK has built up a stockpile of 100 tonnes of plutonium - enough to make 17,000 nuclear bombs, according to a Royal Society report.
The plutonium mainly comes from reprocessed spent uranium fuel from the country's nuclear power plants.
The society warns that it could be made into "a crude nuclear bomb" by a terror group, and is calling for a strategy for its long-term use or disposal.
The government said stocks were protected against the risk of attack.
The society says it first highlighted the problem nine years ago.

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Russian scientists in the Khibinsky Mountains in the Arctic Circle have made an important scientific discovery. They've found a new mineral which absorbs radiation.
It does not yet have an official name and is known only as number 27-4. It can absorb radioactivity from liquid nuclear waste.

"It can extract radioactive substances from any water-based solution and so has a very important practical significance" - Yakov Pakhomovsky, the head of the Kolsky Research Institute.

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K-159 nuclear submarine
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 A group of Russian and foreign experts have begun monitoring radiation levels at the site of a  sunken Russian nuclear submarine in the Barents Sea.
The K-159, a November class nuclear submarine with 800 kilograms  of spent nuclear fuel onboard, sank in 2003 while being towed to Polyarny, in northwest Russia, for decommissioning.
Nine members of the 10-man submarine crew died.

"The goal of the operation is to check radiation levels onboard the sunken submarine and the surrounding area in order to develop plans for a possible salvage operation in the future"  - Spokesman for Russia's Northern Fleet.

Subject to technical feasibility, Russia has committed itself to recovering the submarine and safely disposing of its reactors as part of an international agreement set up to assist with the safe disposal of Russian nuclear waste material.
The operation is being carried out under a project jointly developed by Russia, Britain, the U.S. and Norway within the framework of the Arctic Military Environmental Cooperation agreement (AMEC), signed in September 1996.
Unmanned underwater vehicles operating from the NATO research vessel Alliance will inspect the submarine, which sank to a depth of 238 meters.
There has been no evidence of abnormal radiation levels at the wreck site during previous surveys, and the current operation will include further monitoring.

Source Novosti

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Posts: 131433
Date:
Nuclear Waste Vault
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The US Army now admits that it secretly dumped 64 million pounds of nerve and mustard agents into the sea, along with 400,000 chemical-filled bombs, land mines and rockets and more than 500 tons of radioactive waste - either tossed overboard or packed into the holds of scuttled vessels.

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Andreeva Bay facility
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Scientists from a Norwegian environmental group say they have obtained a leaked report by the Russian government's highest nuclear authority warning of imminent risk of explosion in the enormous tanks holding discarded submarine fuel rods at its Andreeva Bay facility on the Arctic Ocean.
According to the Rosatom report, obtained by researchers at Bellona, an environmental group that has monitored the Russian site near the year-around ice-free naval port of Murmansk for evidence of leakage from radioactive wastes, three large cement tanks, built to house used fuel rods that began leaking in 1982, have begun to deteriorate due to cold and contact with seawater, creating conditions that could lead to an explosion.
Andreeva Bay, on the Kola peninsula of north-western Russia, is the nation's primary spent-nuclear-fuel and radioactive-waste storage facility for its Northern Fleet. Currently, the facility holds 21,000 spent-nuclear-fuel assemblies and about 12,000 cubic meters of solid and liquid radioactive wastes.

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