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TOPIC: Ancient Egyptians


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Queen Hatshepsut
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Discovered in 1903 in the Valley of the Kings, the mummy was left on site until two months ago when it was brought to the Cairo Museum for testing, Egypts antiquities chief Zahi Hawass said.
DNA bone samples taken from the mummys pelvic bone and femur are being compared to the mummy of Queen Hatshepsuts grandmother, Amos Nefreteri, said Egyptian molecular geneticist Yehia Zakaria Gad, who was part of Hawass team.

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-- Edited by Blobrana at 16:16, 2007-07-03

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Obese, plagued with decayed teeth and perhaps a skin disease, Queen Hatshepsut might have spent her last days in pain, according to a preliminary examination of the 3,000-year-old mummy thought to be that of Egypt's greatest female pharaoh.
Bald in front but with long hair in back, the mummy shows an overweight woman just over 5 feet tall, who died at about 50.
This was Hatshepsut, undoubtedly one of the most extraordinary women in recorded history.

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Minister of Culture of Egypt Farouq Hosny and Secretary General of the Supreme Council for antiquities Dr. Zahi Hawas declared that the team which comprised Egyptologists, archaeologists and University Professors uncovered serious secrets that were not known previously during the conduct of studies and researches with radio-active materials over six mummies existing presently at the Egyptian museum and date back to the era of Modern Kingdom.
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Scientists in Egypt claimed today that they had identified the mummy of Queen Hatshepsut, ancient Egypts most powerful female pharaoh and one of its most mysterious rulers.
The archaeologists who made the finding hailed it as a crucial breakthrough in the study of ancient Egypt. It has yet to be independently reviewed by other experts.
The 3,500-year-old mummy was found in a burial ground in the Valley of the Kings in 1903 but was left unidentified at the site for decades, until two months ago when it was brought to the Egyptian Museum in Cairo for testing.
The key to unlocking its identity was a loose tooth found in a relic box believed to contain some of the queens embalmed organs, according to the researchers. The molar is said to have fitted a gap in the jaw of the mummy.

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RE: Ancient Egyptians
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Egyptologists are confident that remains found in a humble tomb in the Valley of the Kings are those of Hatshepsut, one of the most famous queens to rule ancient Egypt.
Egypt's chief archaeologist Professor Zahi Hawass is expected to announce the discovery later this week, which has been touted as the most important find in the area since the discovery of King Tutankhamen.
The candidate for identification as the mummy of Hatshepsut is believed to be one of two females found in 1903 in a small tomb.
The humble tomb is thought to be that of Hatshepsut's wet nurse, Sitre In.

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The discovery of gold cartouches dating back to 1400 BC sheds new light on the relationship between two ancient Egyptian rulers, Egypt's antiquities department said Friday.

A team of French and Egyptian archaeologists have discovered two sets of nine solid gold cartouches bearing the name of Thutmosis III (who ruled from 1479-1425 BC) near the pharaoh's stepmother Queen Hatshepsut's temple in Luxor, 700 kilometres south of Cairo.

"These cartouches... which have the names of Hatshepsut and Thutmosis III have been found near Hatshepsut's obelisk which proves that the obelisk was erected by both rulers" - Zahi Hawass, Secretary General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities.

Thutmosis III, who was Hatshepsut's stepson and co-ruler after the death of his father Thutmosis II in 1479 BC, was widely regarded as having had strained relations with the queen. Thutmosis III was a child when his father died and the rule of the kingdom was initially put in the hands of Hatsheput.
Until the latest discovery, Egyptologists believed that Thutmosis III destroyed Hatshepsut's statues out of jealousy upon her death in 1458 BC, particularly the ones in Hatshepsut's temple in el Deir el Bahary in the southern city of Luxor.

"This goes against earlier views that Thutmosis III tried to hide Hatshepsut's obelisk when he took over as ruler and that he worked to erase any traces left by the queen" - Zahi Hawass.

The new discoveries will be taken to the Luxor Museum to be put on display.

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