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TOPIC: Ancient Egyptians


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RE: Ancient Egyptians
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A rare mummified child from the early period of Egyptian history was discovered buried with a bright green amulet stone once believed to hold magical powers, according to a new study.
The finds help to explain why hieroglyphics and historical texts record that Egyptian children wore green eye makeup. It also adds to the growing body of evidence that ancient Egyptians thought colour itself held sacred energy that could help or hurt individuals.

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Ed ~ alternatively the colour could have symbolised 'rebirth and life'.

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Amenhotep III
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Egyptian archaeologists were in high spirits this week as a greywacke head of the 18th Dynasty King Amenhotep III was returned to Egypt after two decades of being shunted back and forth between Switzerland, Britain and the US

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It is a mystery that has troubled Egyptologists for generations - just why was this mummy screaming 3,000 years ago?
The "Screaming Man" was found buried in a tomb with some of the greatest pharaohs in history, including Rameses the Great, Seti I and Tuthmosis III.
Experts have speculated that the figure could be a foreign prince who had offended the Ancient Egyptians in some way.
Now facial anthropologists have created a 3D picture of the Screaming Man's features and performed a CT scan.

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Switzerland is to return a pharaoh's "eye" stolen 36 years ago from the statue of King Amenhotep III, Egypt's culture minister announced on Wednesday.

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Archaeologists have uncovered a pristinely preserved statue of a powerful Egyptian queen at the sprawling mortuary temple of Amenhotep III on Luxor's West Bank.
A joint European-Egyptian team found the 3.6-meter-tall quartzite figure attached to the broken-off leg of a much larger colossus of Amenhotep III, who ruled from about 1390 to 1350 B.C.
Experts say the newfound statue is of Queen TiyeAmenhotep III's favourite wife and the most influential woman of his 38-year reignbolstering theories that female royalty were gaining in prominence and influence during the time period.

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Ancient Egypt and its gods
A solid copper cast of Princess Sobeknakht Nursing Her Son, dated between 1750-1650 B.C. is displayed. Ancient faiths have a mystery about them that has fascinated the West since Renaissance times. The exhibition "Gift for the Gods: Image from Egyptian Temples," which recently closed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and reopens at the Fondation Pierre Gianadda in Martigny, Switzerland, on March 17, explores this fascination.

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Queen Hatshepsut
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 Discovery Channel will air a special programme titled Secrets of Egypts Lost Queen this Sunday, identifying a 3,500-year-old mummy through archaeological, forensic and scientific evidence.
Described as the most important find in Egypts Valley of the Kings, the mummy being searched is of Hatshepsut, the queen who was the king of Egypt. Hatshepsut was no ordinary woman as she stole the throne from her young stepson, dressed herself as a man and in an unprecedented move declared herself pharaoh. Though her power stretched across Egypt and her reign was prosperous, Hatshepsuts legacy was systematically wiped out from Egyptian history.
The two-hour programme follows a team of top forensic experts and archaeologists led by Dr. Zahi Hawass, Egypts secretary-general of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, as they for the first time ever use the full range of forensic technology to identify Hatshepsut.

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Archaeologists hoped the first tomb discovered in the Valley of the Kings in 80 years would hold the mummy of King Tuts mother. They opened the last of eight sarcophagi, revealing no mummies but finding something almost as valuable: embalming materials and ancient woven flowers. Hushed researchers craned their necks and media scuffled inside the stiflingly hot underground stone chamber Wednesday as Egyptian antiquities chief Zahi Hawass slowly cracked open the coffins lid for what scientists believe is the first time in more than 3,000 years.

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