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TOPIC: Hunting Dinosaurs


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Tyrannosaurus rex
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It turns out that the undisputed king of the dinosaurs, Tyrannosaurus rex, didn't just eat other dinosaurs but also each other. Paleontologists from the United States and Canada have found bite marks on the giants' bones that were made by other T. rex, according to a new study published online Oct. 15 in the journal PLoS ONE.
While searching through dinosaur fossil collections for another study on dinosaur bones with mammal tooth marks, Yale researcher Nick Longrich discovered a bone with especially large gouges in them. Given the age and location of the fossil, the marks had to be made by T. rex, Longrich said.

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RE: Hunting Dinosaurs
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Geologists in Utah have uncovered the first evidence that dinosaurs ate mammals - foraged for them in the undergrowth.
Professor Edward Simpson, who led the research which is published in latest edition of Geology - the journal of the Geolocigal Society of America - explains the importance of the discovery.

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For a bony, ferocious-looking beast with a scandalous past, she has been embraced as quite an icon.
Today, like every other day for the last 10 years, thousands of Chicago area residents and tourists will visit the Field Museum and gaze upon Sue, the biggest, most complete Tyrannosaurus rex fossil ever found.

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A predatory Velociraptor has been caught in the act of eating another larger plant-eating dinosaur.
Palaeontologists have uncovered fossil fragments of Velociraptor teeth alongside scarred bones of the large horned herbivore Protoceratops.
The teeth of the predator match marks on the herbivore's bones, suggesting Velociraptor scavenged its carcass.

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Xixianykus zhangi
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One the most agile dinosaurs so far discovered has been unearthed in China.
The tiny dinosaur, dubbed a "roadrunner" by the scientists who found it, is also one of the smallest dinosaurs known.
Measuring just half a metre long, the fleet-footed theropod named Xixianykus zhangi was likely to have used a huge claw to dig for termites and ants.

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Hunting Dinosaurs
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A foot-long piece of bone unearthed in Australia is the first evidence that ancestors of the mighty T. rex once lived in the Southern Hemisphere.
The remains are from an animal much smaller than the famed predator, but add to the knowledge of how this type of dinosaur evolved.
The discovery is reported in Friday's edition of the journal Science by a team of researchers led by Roger B. J. Benson of the department of earth science at England's University of Cambridge.

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-- Edited by Blobrana on Thursday 25th of March 2010 07:49:16 PM

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The female Tyrannosaurus rex must move her tail to the side for sex - this is one of the new paleobiological findings highlighted in The Discovery Channel show 'Tyrannosaurus Sex.'
The show, created by production firm Locomotive Entertainment Group, explores fully the field of dinosaur reproduction.

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New "Destroyer" Dinosaur Found, Was T. Rex Relative

A 9-meter-long "destroyer" dinosaur once reigned over the Wild West, according to a new study of a fossil T. rex relative found in New Mexico.
Two nearly complete skeletons of the new species, Bistahieversor sealeyi - eversor means "destroyer" in Latin - were discovered in the desolate badlands of New Mexico's Bisti/De-na-zin Wilderness.

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A rare and nearly complete dinosaur skeleton stolen from private property in Montana and stored in an evidence locker for more than two years has been turned over to researchers.
Scientists at the Black Hills Institute of Geological Research in South Dakota say the 70-million-year-old turkey-sized predator could be a new species of raptor.

"It's a mean and nasty little dinosaur. Even though it's not very big, you wouldn't want to meet it in a dark alleyway" - Peter Larson, president of the institute.

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The skeleton of a Tyrannosaurus rex will make its museum debut at the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry along the banks of the Willamette River.
Museum President Nancy Stueber said the fossilised bones of a 40-foot-long predator dinosaur that weighed 7.5 tons and lived 66 million years ago will be on display beginning Dec. 17 through the end of summer 2010.

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