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RE: Doggerland
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Researchers have drawn the first map of that lost world, sketching out a 10,000-year-old landscape filled with marshes, rivers and lakes. It turns out that the region they call Doggerland may have been a sort of paradise for Mesolithic people.
Because the archaeological evidence from the period is thin, Mesolithic people have in the past been depicted by researchers as restless nomads and Doggerland as a land bridge through which they passed without leaving a trace. The new map suggests that, on the contrary, Doggerland would have been an ideal environment for them to linger in - until sea levels, rising since the end of the last ice age, finally inundated it, turning Britain into an island about 8,000 years ago.

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doggere1.jpg

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Indiana University Bloomington will join seven partners in Britain and the Netherlands to investigate early human settlements in Europe.
The $1.81 million (1.1 million pound) Leverhulme Trust grant, spearheaded by the Natural History Museum in London, will be distributed to collaborators over four years. Palaeontologist David Polly oversees IU Bloomington's participation in the Ancient Human Occupation of Britain (AHOB) project. Among his several contributions, Polly will use diverse information to map Europe ecologically -- so he and his colleagues can get a better of idea of what human populations in different parts of Europe might have experienced.

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A 40,000 year-old human bone has been landed by a fishing boat trawling for mussels off the Dutch coast, according to media reports Monday.
Anthropologists from the University of Leipzig in eastern Germany examined the find and confirmed that the forehead bone was "at least 40,000 years old and therefore the oldest ever found underwater," according to August's edition of GEO magazine.

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Part of a Neanderthal man's skull has been dredged up from the North Sea, in the first confirmed find of its kind.
Scientists in Leiden, in the Netherlands, have unveiled the specimen - a fragment from the front of a skull belonging to a young adult male.
Analysis of chemical "isotopes" in the 30,000-60,000-year-old fossil suggest a carnivorous diet, matching results from other Neanderthal specimens.

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Seabed Prehistory
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Wessex Archaeology was commissioned in April 2003 to undertake the research project Seabed Prehistory gauging the effects of marine aggregate dredging, funded by the Aggregate Levy Sustainability Fund (ALSF). The project seeks to demonstrate the scope for assessing prehistoric archaeology that has been covered by rising sea levels.

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A haul of 28 flint hand-axes, dated by archaeologists to be around 100,000 years-old, have been unearthed in gravel from a licensed marine aggregate dredging area 13km off Great Yarmouth.
The find was made by a Dutch amateur archaeologist, Jan Meulmeester, who regularly searches for mammoth bones and fossils in marine sand and gravel delivered by British construction materials supplier Hanson to a Dutch wharf at Vlissingen.
The axes show that deep in the Ice Age, mammoth hunters roamed across land that is now submerged beneath the sea. These are the finest hand-axes that experts are certain come from English waters, although there have been several finds on beaches, for example at Pakefield in Suffolk.

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Solent Stone Age settlement
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A race against time is under way to try to save a Stone Age settlement found buried at the bottom of the sea in the Solent.
Eight thousand years ago the area would have been dry land, a valley and woodland criss-crossed by rivers.
A swamped prehistoric forest was identified off the northern Isle of Wight coast in the 1980s, but Bouldnor Cliff's buried Stone Age village was only found - by chance - a few years ago.

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Mesolithic period Site
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Excavations of an underwater Stone Age archaeological settlement dating back 8000 years are taking place at the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton this week (30 July - 3 August 2007).
Maritime archaeologists from the Hampshire and Wight Trust for Maritime Archaeology (HWTMA) have been working at the site just off the Isle of Wight coast. Divers working at depths of 11 metres have raised sections of the seabed, which have been brought to the NOCS laboratories for excavation.

"This is a site of international importance as it reveals a time before the English Channel existed when Europe and Britain were linked. Earlier excavations have produced flint tools, pristine 8,000-year-old organic material such as acorns, charcoal and worked pieces of wood showing evidence of extensive human activity. This is the only site of its kind in Britain and is extremely important to our understanding of our Stone Age ancestors from the lesser-known Mesolithic period. At first we had no idea of the size of this site, but now we are finding evidence of hearths and ovens so it appears to be an extensive settlement. We are hoping that this excavation will reveal more artefacts and clues to life in the Stone Age" - Garry Momber, Director of HWTMA.

The team of archaeologists will take the sections to the NOCS laboratories where they will painstakingly excavate through the layers of sediment revealing materials that have lain unseen beneath the seabed for over 8000 years. Garry Momber has recruited University of Southampton students to help with the work.

Source National Oceanography Centre, Southampton
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A flood of Biblical proportions swept away the hills which once joined England to France and created the British Isles, according to explosive new research which reshapes the geological history of Britain.
While it had previously been thought that the English Channel was formed by slow erosion combined with rising sea levels, academics now believe it was created in weeks or months as a result of a cataclysmic flood which took place between 200,000 and 450,000 years ago.

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A catastrophic megaflood separated Britain from France hundreds of thousands of years ago, changing the course of British history, according to research published in the journal Nature today.
The study, led by Dr Sanjeev Gupta New Window and Dr Jenny Collier New Window from Imperial College London, has revealed spectacular images of a huge valley tens of kilometres wide and up to 50 metres deep carved into chalk bedrock on the floor of the English Channel.
Using high-resolution sonar waves the team captured images of a perfectly preserved submerged world in the channel basin. The maps highlight deep scour marks and landforms which were created by torrents of water rushing over the exposed channel basin.

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