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See Amazing New Sun Images From NJIT's Big Bear Solar Observatory

2010-292.jpg NJIT Distinguished Professor Philip R. Goode and the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) team have achieved  "first light" using a  deformable mirror in what is called adaptive optics at BBSO.

Goode said that the images were achieved with the 1.6 m clear aperture, off-axis New Solar Telescope (NST) at BBSO.   The telescope has a resolution covering about 50 miles on the Sun's surface.

The telescope, the worlds' largest ground-based solar instrument, is the crown jewel of BBSO, the first facility-class solar observatory built in more than a generation in the U.S.   It is undergoing commissioning at BBSO.  Since 1997, under Goode's direction, NJIT has owned and operated BBSO.  It is located in a clear mountain lake,  characterised by sustained atmospheric stability.  This is essential for BBSO's primary interests of measuring and understanding solar complex phenomena utilising dedicated telescopes and instruments.

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NJIT To Dedicate New Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory on Oct. 3, 2009
During the next decade, solar physicists will learn more than they might have dreamed possible about the Sun, thanks to current technologies that have advanced the capacity of ground-based and space-based instruments.   All the more reason for the excitement on Oct. 3, 2009 when NJIT formally dedicates the new solar telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO), CA.
The NJIT dedication will take place at 10:30 a.m. at the Observatory in Big Bear, CA.

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World's Largest Telescope Captures Sun's Magnetic Field Better
NJIT's new 1.6-meter clear aperture solar telescope-the largest of its kind in the world-is now operational.


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A new 1.6-meter clear aperture solar telescope--the largest of its kind in the world--has seen "first scientific light": it's now operational.
The unveiling of the instrument, cited as the pathfinder for future, large ground-based telescopes, could not have come at a more auspicious moment, scientists say. This year marks the 400th anniversary of Galileo's telescope, used to demonstrate that sunspots are indeed located on the Sun.

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Astronomers at the Big Bear Solar Observatory are looking forward to the completion of a new telescope that could change the way mankind understands the sun.
Observatory director Philip Goode says the new apparatus will feature the largest aperture of any solar telescope in the world.
Studying the light that passes through the telescope's 1.6-meter aperture could not only provide astronomers with more pure knowledge of the nature of the sun's magnetic field, but also lead to discoveries that could be applied to protect satellites from solar energy.
 
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During the next decade, solar physicists will learn more than they have dreamed possible about the Sun, thanks to current technologies that have advanced the capacity of land-based instruments. Such advancements will be the focus of a talk on March 26, 2008 by noted NJIT solar astronomer Philip R. Goode, PhD. Goode  has led a five-year project to build the worlds most capable 1.6-meter solar telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory. First light has been slated for May, 2008.

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The Big Bear Solar Observatory is located on a spit of land in the middle of Big Bear Lake, California, to exploits the excellent climatic conditions of Big Bear Lake, and reduce the image distortion, which usually occurs when the Sun heats the ground and produces convection in the air just above the ground.


Position: Latitude: 34° 15.2' N Longitude: 116° 54.9' W

The observatory is located at an altitude of 2067 metres.
The Observatory was built by the California Institute of Technology in 1969 and operated by the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT). Funding for the operation of the observatory is from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), the United States Air Force, the United States Navy and other agencies.

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