* Astronomy

Members Login
Post Info
TOPIC: Keck Observatory


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Keck Cosmic Web Imager
Permalink  
 


W. M. Keck Observatory Achieves First Light with New Instrument

W. M. Keck Observatory overnight captured the very first successful science data from its newest, cutting-edge instrument, the Keck Cosmic Web Imager (KCWI).
KCWI captures three-dimensional data, as opposed to the traditional two-dimensional image or spectrum of conventional instruments. In a single observation, it records an image of the object at multiple wavelengths allowing scientists to explore both the spatial dimension (as in an image) and the spectral dimension (or colour) of an object.

Read more



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Keck Observatory
Permalink  
 


Keck Observatory's New Planet Imager Delivers First Science

A new device on the W. M. Keck Observatory in Hawaii has delivered its first images, showing a ring of planet-forming dust around a star and, separately, a cool star-like body, called a brown dwarf, lying near to its companion star.
The device, called the vortex coronagraph, was recently installed inside the Near Infrared Camera 2 (NIRC2), the workhorse infrared imaging camera at Keck.

Read more



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
W. M. Keck Observatory
Permalink  
 


W. M. Keck Observatory Will Peer Deep into the Cosmic Web

W. M. Keck Observatory (Keck Observatory) is pushing the cutting edge of scientific discovery with the addition of the world's most sensitive instrument for measuring the tendrils of faint gas in the intergalactic medium known as the cosmic web. The 5-ton instrument, the size of an ice cream truck, is named the Keck Cosmic Web Imager (KCWI).
KCWI will uncover vital clues about the life-cycle of galaxies, helping to unravel mysteries about our universe.

Read more



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
MOSFIRE Instrument
Permalink  
 


 First Light of Powerful New MOSFIRE Instrument

Engineers and astronomers are celebrating the much anticipated first light of the MOSFIRE instrument, now installed on the Keck I telescope at W. M. Keck Observatory. MOSFIRE (Multi-Object Spectrometer For Infra-Red Exploration) will vastly increase the data gathering power of what is already the world's most productive ground-based observatory.
Read more  

Credit: W. M. Keck Observatory
An unprocessed image from the MOSFIRE instrument made on the "first light" night of April 4, 2012. The powerful Keck I telescope and sensitive new instrument were able to gather this infrared image of two interacting galaxies called The Antennae, despite fast-moving high clouds over Mauna Kea that night.


__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Keck Observatory
Permalink  
 


 MOSFIRE Installation into Keck 1



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
MOSFIRE
Permalink  
 


  Powerful New Astronomy Tool Arrives on Mauna Kea

A 10,000-pound package was delivered on Feb. 16 to the W. M. Keck Observatory near the summit of Mauna Kea. Inside is a powerful new scientific instrument that will dramatically increase the cosmic data gathering power of what is already the worlds most productive ground-based observatory.
The new instrument is called MOSFIRE (Multi-Object Spectrometer For Infra-Red Exploration). It is the newest tool to survey the cosmos and help astronomers learn more about star formation, galaxy formation and the early universe. The spectrometer was made possible through funding provided by the National Science Foundation and a generous donation from astronomy benefactors Gordon and Betty Moore.

Read more 



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
W. M. Keck Observatory
Permalink  
 


Laurie Goldstein, a resident of North Kohala, will host a mixed media art show, entitled "Universe in Colour" at the W. M. Keck Observatory headquarters, located at 65-1120 Mamalahoa Highway, in Waimea. The exhibit runs from May 20 to September 22. Public viewing of Goldstein's art will be available during Keck Observatorys monthly astronomy lectures.
Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Keck Observatory
Permalink  
 


On Oct. 9, astronomers at the W. M. Keck Observatory used the Keck II telescope to search for water harboured in the Moon's permanently shadowed craters.
The observations were made as part of the Observatory's participation in NASA's Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite, or LCROSS, mission. At 1:31 and 1:35 a.m. Hawaii Standard Time, two LCROSS impactors collided with the crater Cabeus on the South Pole of the Moon.
Diane Wooden of the NASA Ames Research Centre in Moffett Field, Calif. used Keck II with its Near Infrared Echelle Spectrograph, or NIRSPEC, to analyse the resulting ejecta plume for the chemical signature of water vapour.

Read more

__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Permalink  
 

Snow fell atop Mauna Kea for the first time this season over the weekend, but it melted two hours later.
About an inch fell Saturday morning, leading the Mauna Kea Weather Station to issue a 5:32 a.m. advisory that the road to the summit was closed. But the road reopened by about 9 a.m. as the warming day melted the covering.

Read more

__________________
1 2  >  Last»  | Page of 2  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard