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Post Info TOPIC: Partial Solar Eclipse - June 1 2011


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RE: Partial Solar Eclipse - June 1 2011
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Partial eclipse of the Sun seen by Proba-2's main SWAP



On June 1st, a partial eclipse of the Sun became visible across northern
latitudes - and also from Earth orbit.
Between 2040 and 2246 GMT, ESA's Proba-2 micro-satellite twice crossed the
path of the lunar shadow to return views of the partial solar eclipse.
Proba-2's main SWAP (Sun Watcher using APS detectors and imaging processing) instrument acquired a new image every 30 seconds, built up into the movie seen here.



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Solar Eclipse Timelapse

 

Midnight solar eclipse at Geitvågen in Bodø - Northern Norway, 1. June 2011. 



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Skygazers set for partial eclipse

Skygazers are preparing to observe a partial solar eclipse, visible on Wednesday across parts of the Northern Hemisphere.
The eclipse can be seen in northern parts of China, Japan, Siberia, Scandinavia, Scotland, Iceland and Canada.
The eclipse shadow hits the Earth in northern China and Siberia at 1925 GMT.
The point of greatest eclipse occurs in western Siberia about two hours later.

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This partial eclipse of the Sun will be visible in the United Kingdom, but you will have to be located in either the northernmost part of the Shetland Islands or on the north-west coast of the Isle of Lewis in the Hebrides.
If we use Skaw on Unst in the Shetland Island as an example, the eclipse begins at 21:05:13 UT. The lower limb of the Sun sets at 21:11.7 UT and the upper limb sets at 21:18.7 UT. The Moon begins to obscure the Sun at the "2:30 position" on the Sun's disc, the eclipse will only be visible for a little under ten minutes assuming clear conditions near the horizon. Someone observing the eclipse may see a maximum obscuration of approximately 4% as the sun sets.

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A Rare Eclipse of the Midnight Sun

It sounds like an oxymoron: a solar eclipse at midnight.
According to NASA, it's about to happen.

"It might sound like a contradiction to have a solar eclipse in the middle of the night, but this is what we will see in northern Norway, Sweden and Finland on June 1st" - Knut Joergen Roed Oedegaard, an astrophysicist at the Norwegian Centre for Science Education in Oslo.

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A partial solar eclipse will occur on June 1, 2011. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partially obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth.
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Information and visibility for the "Partial solar eclipse" on June 1, 2011



Information and an animation of the partial solar eclipse which will occur on June 1, 2011. The really dark area represents night, the bright area represents day, and the somewhat dark round area is where the eclipse will be visible. Visibility looks to be confined to Siberia, Greenland, the arctic ocean, and extreme north-western Canada.



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Partial Solar Eclipse - June 1 2011



Partial solar eclipse occurs at the Moon's descending node in Taurus. The event is visible from high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere .
The eclipse begins at sunrise in Siberia and northern China where the penumbral shadow first touches Earth at 19:25:18 UT. Two hours later, greatest eclipse occurs at 21:16:11 UT. At that time, an eclipse of magnitude 0.601 will be visible from the Arctic coast of western Siberia as the midnight Sun skirts the northern horizon. Although most of Alaska and northern Canada will witness the partial eclipse, the southern limit of the penumbra falls along a curve from south of Fairbanks to central New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.
Reykjavik, Iceland receives a 0.462 magnitude eclipse just before sunset. Northern most Norway, Sweden and Finland also get a midnight Sun eclipse with the event hanging above the northern horizon. The partial eclipse ends at 23:06:56 UT when the penumbra leaves Earth just north of Newfoundland in the Atlantic Ocean.
Eclipse times and local circumstances for major cities in North America, Europe and Asia are given in. The Sun's altitude, azimuth, the eclipse magnitude and obscuration are given at the instant of maximum eclipse.
This is the 68th eclipse of Saros 118. The family began with a group of 8 partial eclipses from the years 803 to 929. The Saros ends with a small partial eclipse in 2083.



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