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RE: Jupiter
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Massive Jupiter is undergoing dramatic atmospheric changes that have never been seen before with the keen "eye" of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.
Jupiter's turbulent clouds are always changing as they encounter atmospheric disturbances while sweeping around the planet at hundreds of miles per hour. But these Hubble images reveal a rapid transformation in the shape and colour of Jupiter's clouds near the equator, marking an entire face of the globe.

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Credit: NASA, ESA, A. Simon-Miller (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center), A. Sánchez-Lavega, R. Hueso, and S. Pérez-Hoyos (University of the Basque Country), E. García-Melendo (Esteve Duran Observatory Foundation, Spain), and G. Orton (Jet Propulsion Laboratory)

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New Horizons at Jupiter – Science Briefing
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NASAs New Horizons spacecraft has provided new data on the Jupiter system ­-- stunning scientists with never-before-seen perspectives of the giant planets atmosphere, rings, moons and magnetosphere.
These new views include the closest peek yet at the Earth-sized Little Red Spot storm churning materials through Jupiters cloud tops; detailed images of small satellites herding dust and boulders through Jupiters faint rings; and of volcanic eruptions and circular grooves on the planets largest moons.

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RE: Jupiter
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New volcanoes, dramatic volcanic plumes, a recent impact from a possible comet and the tops of thunderhead clouds are the highlights in a scrapbook of images from the New Horizons spacecraft's recent swing past Jupiter.
The NASA probe's ultimate destinations are Pluto and a ring of icy bodies beyond Neptune known as the Kuiper Belt. But the side trip to Jupiter gave New Horizons a boost in speed thanks to Jupiter's intense gravity, shaving three years off its travel time. The probe made its closest pass of Jupiter on 28 February.
In the best ever photos of Jupiter's faint ring system, the tiny moons Metis and Adrastea can be seen keeping the boulders and dust in the rings in line.

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Here is a series of photos that depict the Shoemaker Levy 9 Comet's impact on Jupiter set to the music of Electic Light Orchestra's song "Shine A Little Love".



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Jupiter's aurora
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This ultraviolet image of Jupiter was taken with the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on 26 November 1998. The bright emissions above the dark blue background are auroral lights, similar to those seen above the Earth's polar regions. The aurorae are curtains of light resulting from high energy electrons following the planet's magnetic field into the upper atmosphere, where collisions with atmospheric atoms and molecules produce the observed light.

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Credits: NASA, ESA & John T. Clarke (Univ. of Michigan)

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Kore
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A name for a Jovian satellite (Kore) has been approved by the IAU WGPSN.

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Jupiter's auroras
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 NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has observed some spectacular Northern Lights on the planet Jupiter. The data may help researchers solve the mysteries of the biggest auroras in the solar system.

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So you thought Northern Lights were big in Alaska? "That's nothing," says Randy Gladstone of the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, Texas. "Jupiter has auroras bigger than our entire planet."
Last month, Gladstone and colleagues used NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory to capture this picture:


xray_auroras
Credit: NASA

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Little Red Spot
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The New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) has returned stunning new images of Jupiter's Little Red Spot, obtained as a 2-by-2 mosaic at 0312 UTC on February 27, 2007, from a distance of 3 million kilometres. The image scale is 15 kilometres per pixel.
By comparison, team members say, ground-based and Earth-orbiting imagers rarely do better than 200-kilometer resolution on Jupiter.

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Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute

LORRI took this mosaic 9½ hours - or not quite one Jupiter rotation period - after snapping its previous images of the Little Red Spot on Feb 26, 2007, at a longer range of 3.5 million kilometres and at a lower resolution of 17 kilometres per pixel. The new mosaic was obtained with the Little Red Spot closer to the centre of the visible disk of Jupiter, so there is less foreshortening and better illumination.
The Little Red Spot is an Earth-sized storm on Jupiter that changed its colour from white to red in 2005. Swimming to the east, its clouds rotate counterclockwise (or in the anticyclonic direction), meaning that it is a high-pressure region. In that sense, the Little Red Spot is the opposite of a hurricane on Earth, which is a low-pressure region - and it is of course much larger than any hurricane on Earth.

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