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The Large Hadron Collider has successfully created a "mini-Big Bang" by smashing together lead ions instead of protons.
The scientists working at the enormous machine on Franco-Swiss border achieved the unique conditions on 7 November.
The experiment created temperatures a million times hotter than the centre of the Sun.

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The LHC enters a new phase

Proton running for 2010 in the LHC at CERN1 came to a successful conclusion today at 08:00 CET. Since the end of March, when the first collisions occurred at a total energy of 7 TeV, the machine and experiment teams have achieved all of their objectives for the first year of proton physics at this record energy and new ground has been explored. For the rest of the year the LHC is moving to a different phase of operation, in which lead ions will be accelerated and brought into collision in the machine for the first time.
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Researchers at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are getting set to recreate the Big Bang on a miniature scale.
Since 2009, the world's highest-energy particle accelerator has been smashing together protons, in a bid to shed light on the fundamental nature of matter.
But now the huge machine will be colliding lead ions instead.

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Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider say they are getting some fascinating early results as they get set to probe new areas of physics.
The giant machine on the Franco-Swiss border is studying the fundamental nature of matter by smashing together proton particles at near light-speed.
Its CMS detector is reported to have seen "new and interesting effects".

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LHC experiment observes a potentially new and interesting effect

After almost six months of operation, experiments at the LHC are starting to see signs of potentially new and interesting effects. In results announced by the CMS collaboration today in Geneva, correlations have been observed between particles produced in 7 TeV proton-proton collisions.
Having re-measured known physics in time for the summer conferences, the LHC experiments are now starting to probe new ground. ATLAS recently extended limits on excited quarks, while the LHCb detector has demonstrated its capacity by observing atom-like particles built from beauty quarks and antiquarks.

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CMS event display showing proton-proton collisions

After almost six months of operation, experiments at the LHC are starting to see signs of potentially new and interesting effects. In results announced by the CMS collaboration today, correlations have been observed between particles produced in 7 TeV proton-proton collisions.
In some of the LHCs proton-proton collisions, a hundred or more particles can be produced. The CMS collaboration has studied such collisions by measuring angular correlations between the particles as they fly away from the point of impact, and this has revealed that some of the particles are intimately linked in a way not seen before in proton collisions.

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First results from Large Hadron Collider announced

A group of University of Toronto high-energy physicists, along with their 3,000 ATLAS colleagues, announced they have broken world records in the search for new particles as the first findings from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) were presented this morning in Paris, France.
The first results, following only three months of successful operation of the LHC, have "rediscovered" some of the familiar particles that lie at the heart of the Standard Model of physics. The Standard Model theory has formed the basis of theoretical particle physics for more than 30 years, explaining the particles of matter and the forces that bind them. The first results confirm that the Standard Model is working as expected. This is an essential step before the LHC moves on to new territory, including its ultimate goal of finding the Higgs Boson particle, aka the God particle. If found, the Higgs Boson would fully satisfy the Standard Model theory. It would explain why all other known particles exhibit the mass they do and how all existing matter came to be. The scientists are also hoping to uncover the solution to the puzzle of mysterious dark matter that dominates the universe.

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When it was first unveiled, the Large Hadron Collider was heralded as the instrument that would produce a "tiny bang" and reveal the opening moments of the Universe.
But the scientists behind the device revealed yesterday that they now want to delve deeper into the secrets of the Big Bang by creating an even bigger device.
Instead of whirling particles around in vast rings and slamming them into each other, as they are currently doing with the LHC at Cern, a particle physics laboratory outside Geneva, and the smaller Tevatron at Fermilab near Chicago, scientists want a next-generation machine that will shoot them straight along a 31-mile tunnel called the International Linear Collider (ILC).

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Scientists working on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) say they have moved a step closer to their aim of unlocking the mysteries of the Universe.
The world's highest-energy particle accelerator has produced a record-breaking particle collision rate - about double the previous rate.
The collider is now generating around 10,000 particle collisions per second, according to physicist Andrei Golutvin.

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The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is recovering from a general power cut which affected the machine's systems.
Cern, the organisation which runs the LHC, said it had taken until Monday morning for the machine to recover.
The electrical cut after 2300 local time on Friday may have been caused by storms, according to a spokesperson.

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