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RE: Cooper Basin
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An important geothermal resource area in Australia has been found to have a less known, asteroid-related history, as Dr. TonguÁ Uysal from the University of Queensland did some research on the energy capabilities of the Cooper Basin.
Located at the border between Queensland and South Australia, the place is thought of being hit by an asteroid more than 300 million years ago. The impact created an 80 km-wide shock zone and is supposed of being the second-largest asteroid that ever hit Australia.

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The Avery Resources geo satellite survey of the Cooper Basin.

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Cooper Basin crater
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Title: Evidence of impact shock metamorphism in basement granitoids, Cooper Basin, South Australia
Authors: Andrew Y. Glikson and I.TonguÁ Uysal

The original observation of parallel closely spaced (microns to tens of microns) planar features in quartz grains from basement granitoid samples of Cooper Basin drill holes by I.T.† Uysal, followed by Universal stage, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) tests by A.Y. Glikson, identify intracrystalline planar deformation features (PDF) in quartz which correspond to unique Miller indices diagnostic of shock metamorphism. U-Stage measurements of angles between the C-optic axis of quartz (Cqz) and poles to planar deformation features (Ppdf) in the same quartz grains (87 planar sets in quartz 54 grains) define intracrystalline planar orientations dominated by {10-13} and {10-12} Miller indices, correlated with shock pressures above 10 Gpa and above 20 Gpa, respectively (Engelhard and Stoffler, 1968; French, 1968; Stoffler, 1974; Stoffler and Langenhorst, 1994; Grieve et al., 1996; French, 1998). These Miller indices are characteristic of large impact structures, including Chesapeake Bay (D~85 km), Woodleigh (D~120 km) and other impact structures.

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RE: Cooper Basin
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Giant asteroid impact discovered in Australia

A geothermal energy researcher from the University of Queensland (UQ) has found evidence of a major asteroid impact that occurred more than 300 million years ago in the South Australian outback. The asteroid, which produced a shock zone at least 80km wide, could be the second-largest asteroid ever found in Australia. UQs Queensland Geothermal Energy Centre of Excellence researcher, Dr Tonguc Uysal, discovered the asteroid impact during his studies of the Cooper Basin, which is a large geothermal energy resource being developed in Australia on the border between Queensland and South Australia. The rock deformations were confirmed as being the result of an asteroid impact through microscopic examination of the quartz crystals and further laboratory tests conducted by Dr Andrew Glikson, from the Australian National University.
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A University of Queensland (UQ) researcher has found evidence of a major asteroid impact that occurred near the Queensland-South Australia border more than 300 million years ago.
The asteroid, which produced a shock zone at least 80km wide, could be the second-largest asteroid ever found in Australia.
UQ geothermal energy researcher Dr Tongu Uysal discovered the asteroid impact during his studies of the Cooper Basin, which is a large geothermal energy resource being developed on the border between Queensland and South Australia.

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