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TOPIC: June 2010


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RE: June 2010
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NASA Keeps a Wary Eye on Space Weather

Earth and space are about to come into contact in a way that's new to human history. To make preparations, authorities in Washington DC are holding a meeting: The Space Weather Enterprise Forum at the National Press Club on June 8th
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june.gif

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Tonight, Mars is in conjunction with the star Regulus, in the constellation Leo.
Look to the west after sunset.

MARS060610.gif

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On Tuesday morning, the solar system's No. 7 planet is close enough in the sky to Jupiter to appear in a telescope almost like one of the four brightest moons. Uranus, however, has a dull blue-green tinge to it.
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This first full week of June, we have an opportunity to easily see with just the naked eye the planets Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn in our Shamokin sky, even if you're viewing from places doused in heavy urban light pollution. Also, as a bonus, with the help of just a modest pair of binoculars, you can also easily find Uranus. Neptune is the only planet not easily seen this week. If you're like me and still count Pluto as a planet, it's also beyond the reach of casual stargazers, but don't get me started about Pluto being officially declassified or "fired" as one of our planets.
Venus is by far the easiest of the planets to spot. It's the brightest star-like object in the sky. Our closest neighbour in the solar system and second-closest planet to the sun is a bright beacon in the low western sky, seen even before the end of evening twilight. As bright as it is, there isn't a whole lot to see on Venus, even with a larger telescope because it's completely shrouded by a thick and poisonous cloud cover that produces a run away greenhouse effect on the Venusian surface.

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June is named for the Roman goddess Juno, wife of the king of the gods, Jupiter. Juno is also the name of a large asteroid, the third discovered. Unfortunately, the asteroid Juno sets in the west this June around sunset.
Brilliant Venus low in the west-northwest will still be the first object visible in the evening sky but there is a contest between two bright stars to see which of them will be visible first.

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What's Up for June? Venus. And a planetary necklace spanning the sky from dusk to dawn.
Hello, and welcome. I'm Jane Houston Jones at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.
June marks the summer solstice in the northern hemisphere, when the sun is highest north of the celestial equator, when it makes its highest path across the sky. This means the days are long and the nights are short.
Make the best of the short nights and look for Venus a half hour after sunset, low on the western horizon. By mid-month, you'll see Earth's twin pass the pretty Beehive Star Cluster.
On the 15th check out the lineup of the slender crescent moon, the Beehive Cluster, Venus and Gemini's twin namesake stars: Castor and Pollux.
Another pair of planets is nearby. Mars, which is just a dot or a small disk in a telescope now, pairs up with Leo's brightest star Regulus, and is not too far from Saturn.
Keep an eye on the moon mid-month, too. It passes Venus on the 14th and Mars on the 16th.
Last year, steely-eyed observers caught a glimpse of Neptune near Jupiter. And this year you'll find Uranus next to the king of the planets. It's easy to know when you've spotted it. The blue-green colour is unmistakeable. But you'll have to wait until nearly dawn. Jupiter doesn't even rise until after 2 a.m.
Even Pluto is worth hunting this month. The dwarf planet is a challenging object visible against the starry blanket of brighter Milky Way stars. You'll need a good, experienced star tour guide and a dark sky with good southern horizons to spot it.
When school is out, you'll be treated to an amazing Milky Way spiralling overhead from south to north, a little after midnight.
You might even see some shooting stars from June's minor meteor showers this month.

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June skies are jam-packed with spectacular sights

If you like going to buffets for the variety, then that is exactly what is in store for you in the starry heavens this month. From planets, asteroids and comets, the night sky in June has something for everyone.
Starting on June 6 the king of all planets, Jupiter, joins the waning crescent moon in the dawn sky in the east. The gas giant remains the bright 'morning star for the rest of the summer until it moves into the evening skies this autumn.

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Planetary rise and set times
DATE MERCURY VENUS MARS JUPITER SATURN
Rise Set Rise Set Rise Set Rise Set Rise Set
June    10 4:16 AM5:02 PM8:06 AM9:04 PM10:47 AM11:17 PM12:50 AM12:51 PM12:37 PM12:50 AM
June    20 4:49 AM5:47 PM8:21 AM9:11 PM10:30 AM10:55 PM12:15 AM12:17 PM11:59 PM12:11 AM
June   30 5:42 AM6:44 PM8:32 AM9:14 PM10:14 AM10:34 PM11:35 AM11:41 PM11:21 PM11:29 PM


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The Philippines will have a chance to see the moon turn red during a partial lunar eclipse expected this month, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration said.
According to the agency's astronomical diary for June, a lunar eclipse will appear as a partial lunar eclipse in the country on June 26. Around half of the moon will be covered, with PAGASA estimating the eclipse's magnitude (the size of the eclipsed part) at 54.2 percent.

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