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DNA analysis of human hair preserved in Greenland's permafrost has given clues as to what the owner looked like.
A study, published in the journal Nature, says the individual's genome is the oldest to have been sequenced from a modern human.
The researchers say the man, who lived 4,000 years ago, had brown eyes and thick dark hair, although he would have been prone to baldness.
They say the genome also shows that his ancestors migrated from Siberia.
The man has been named Inuk, which means "human" in the Greenlandic language.

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Surviving Ancient Alaska

The National Geographic Channel looks thousands of years into Alaska's past tonight for its "Naked Science" series show on how humans adapted to conditions on this side of the Bering Land Bridge.
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Thousands of years of human activity along the Upper Peninsula's Lake Superior shoreline have come into sharper focus after three years of research.
Scientists from Northern Michigan University's geography department recently completed a project at Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore that located 23 new archaeological sites.
The researchers also helped define the shoreline as it existed 4,500 years ago.

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A 10,000-year-old stone weapon from the first humans to have lived in Ontario has been discovered in the archeological survey for the towns new arena, baseball and soccer complex.
Newmarket archaeologist Kim Slocki said she found a single "projectile point" in her pre-construction survey of the arena site.

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Archaeologists claim to have found the oldest known artefact in the Americas, a scraper-like tool in an Oregon cave that dates back 14,230 years.
The tool shows that people were living in North America well before the widespread Clovis culture of 12,900 to 12,400 years ago, says archaeologist Dennis Jenkins of the University of Oregon in Eugene.

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Prehistoric Clovis culture roamed southwards
Scientists have discovered a site containing the most extensive evidence seen so far in Mexico for the Clovis culture. The find extends the range of America's oldest identifiable culture, which roamed North America about 13,000 years ago.

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Edmonton archaeological dig uncovers old campsite and possibly . . . soup.
An archaeologist has discovered in Edmonton an intact 2,000- year-old campsite with enough detail to even guess at the recipe the ancient people used for their soup.
The black circle of ash, scattered bison bone fragments and chipped rock doesnt count as a major scientific discovery, said Gareth Spicer, principal archaeologist with Calgary-based Turtle Island Cultural Resource Management. But the site has enough diverse elements to tell a story about the lives of a small group of people who camped by the river for several days.

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Rock shelter yields rare proof of early Ohioans
More than 10,000 years ago, an ice-age hunter likely stopped to change a broken spear point beneath a rock overhang in what is now northwestern Coshocton County. A volunteer working with an Ashland University professor found the broken point last month. It has distinctive vertical grooves, or flutes, at its base, and that means it is far older than most flint arrowheads and spear points found in Ohio. It offers rare proof that the Paleo-Indians who hunted mastodons in Ohio during the last ice age sometimes used the rock shelters that dot the state.

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The lost voyage: First English-led expedition to North America
Evidence of a previously unknown voyage to North America in 1499, led by a Bristol explorer, is to be published this week in the academic journal Historical Research.
The article by Dr Evan Jones, a historian at Bristol University, suggests that a Bristol merchant, William Weston, undertook a voyage to the 'New Found Land' just two years after the first voyage of Venetian explorer John Cabot who sailed from Bristol to 'discover' North America in 1497.

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Erie scientist leads what could be ground-breaking search for early Americans
Andrew Hemmings walked Wednesday on a Florida beach that man hasn't set foot on in more than 13,000 years.
Not because it isn't a popular stretch of real estate - it's just that few people are able to don full scuba gear and dive 40 feet under water in the Gulf of Mexico for a stroll in the sand.
The University of Texas archaeologist is part of an elite team of scientists led by James Adovasio of Mercyhurst College in Erie. Adovasio, former chairman of the University of Pittsburgh's anthropology department, is looking for evidence of the earliest North American settlements along the coast of Florida that were submerged thousands of years ago by glacial ice melting.

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