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Post Info TOPIC: Herse


L

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Nomenclature
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By convention,  new Jupiter satellites receive a Gréco-Roman mythological name. For Jupiter satellites more distant than the four principal satellites, and which orbit is in the same direction as the planet receive a name (in Latin) ending in an "a", while those turning in the Jupiter opposite direction (retrograde orbit) receive a name (in Greek) ending in an "e".
Themisto is an exception to the rule partly because this satellite is closer to Callisto.


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L

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RE: Herse
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Orbital elements:
S/2003 J 19
Epoch 2003 June 10.0 TT = JDT 2452800.5 MPC
M 118.57906 (2000.0) P Q
n 0.51367856 Peri. 180.52955 -0.78442749 -0.59217892
a 0.1520471 Node 38.83812 -0.56795485 +0.80529555
e 0.3336170 Incl. 162.90141 -0.24920033 +0.02869143
P 1.92 H 16.7 P/d 700.83

MPEC 2003 - G64


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L

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S/2003 J 19
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S/2003 J 19 is a natural satellite of Jupiter. It was discovered by a team of astronomers led by Brett J. Gladman, et al. in 2003.
S/2003 J 19 is about 2 kilometres in diameter, and orbits Jupiter at an average distance of 22,709 Mm in 699.125 days, at an inclination of 165° to the ecliptic (164° to Jupiter's equator), in a retrograde direction and with an eccentricity of 0.1961.

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L

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Herse
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The International Astronomical Union (IAU) has approved the name Herse  for the moon Jupiter L discovered  on the 27th February, 2003 by B. Gladman, J. Kavelaars, J.-M. Petit, and L. Allen at the Mauna Kea observatory.

Herse is a figure in Greek mythology, daughter of Cecrops (or, according to Pausanias, of Actaeus), sister to Aglauros and Pandrosos.
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