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Carlsbergite
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Carlsbergite is a nitride mineral that has the chemical formula CrN.
It is named after the Carlsberg Foundation which backed the recovery of the Agpalilik fragment of the Cape York meteorite in which the mineral was first described

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RE: Cape York meteorite
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Greenland Pt anomaly may point to noncataclysmic Cape York meteorite entry

Petaev et al. tested the suite of hypotheses (collectively known as the impact hypothesis) that a swarm of impacts or airbursts from comets, chondritic, or stony asteroids caused an abrupt climate change, continental-scale wildfires, mass extinctions, and collapse of the Clovis culture at or near the Younger Dryas Boundary (YDB). The authors identify a large Pt anomaly in the Greenland Ice Sheet Project 2 (GISP2) core and suggest that it hints at an extraterrestrial source. Because there is no corresponding Ir spike, Petaev et al. challenge the impact hypothesis by proposing a highly fractionated iron meteorite. The Pt anomaly predates ammonimum and nitrate peaks in the GISP2 core by decades,
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The startling theory, tentatively floated two decades ago by Canadian Museum of Civilization curator emeritus Robert McGhee, has been bolstered by recent research indicating a later and faster migration of the ancient Thule Inuit across North America's polar frontier than previously believed.
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One of Canada's top archeologists argues in a new book that the prehistoric ancestors of this country's 55,000 Inuit probably migrated rapidly from Alaska clear across the Canadian North in just a few years - not gradually over centuries as traditionally assumed - after they learned about a rich supply of iron from a massive meteorite strike on Greenland's west coast.
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Ahnighito meteorite
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At 77 north, Qaanaaq is the northernmost hamlet in Greenland. Squeezed between mountains and the sea, the town spreads across desertic scree. Removed 153 kilometres from more hospitable terrain in 1953, to make way for the U.S. Cold War Thule airbase, Qaanaaqs inhabitants survive by hunting narwhal, seal and long-line halibut fishing.
Housed in a building once inhabited by Knud Rasmussen, a small museum showcases the history, artifacts and artworks of the community. Here you can see explorer Robert Pearys ethnographic portraits of his young Greenlandic wife in various states of "native" undress. The museum also details Pearys theft of the bulk of an iron-rich meteorite that had supplied inhabitants of the entire Baffin Bay region with iron for tools for more than 1,000 years.

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Cape York meteorite
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The Cape York meteorite, which collided with Earth nearly 10,000 years ago, is named for Cape York, the location of its discovery in Greenland, and is one of the largest iron meteorites in the world. The iron masses were known to Inuit as Ahnighito (the Tent), weighing 31 metric tons; the Woman, weighing 3 metric tons; and the Dog, weighing 400 kg.
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Latitude: : 76 7'59.99"N, Longitude: 6455'59.99"W

The largest fragment of the great nickel-iron Cape York meteorite measures 3.4 meters x 2.1 meters x 1.7 meters, and weighs approximately 32 tons. The Ahnighito ("tent") and the other large fragments were used by the local Inuit people for thousands of years as a source of iron for their tools and harpoons. The Arctic explorer Robert Peary brought this portion of the meteorite from Greenland to the United States in the late 1800's, selling it to the American Museum of Natural History for USD $40,000.

A total of seven fragments of the huge Cape York meteorite have been identified; three are on display here. Ahnighito, the large mass in the centre of the room, is the biggest piece of Cape York ever discovered.
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