* Astronomy

Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: The Dumbbell Nebula


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: The Dumbbell Nebula
Permalink  
 


Messier 27, The Dumbbell nebula in the Constellation Vulpecula

Picture 337
Date: 19.04.15

45 x 4 second frames captured with a 8" f5 reflector and Canon EOS 350D.

Motorised EQ5 Mount.

Prime focus.



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
NGC 6853
Permalink  
 


NGC 6853 (also Messier 27, M27, and the Dumbbell Nebula) is a magnitude +7.5 planetary nebula located 1,360 light-years away in the constellation Vulpecula.

The nebula was discovered by French astronomer Charles Messier on the 12th July 1764.

Right Ascension 19h 59m 36.340s, Declination +22 43' 16.09"



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Messier 27
Permalink  
 


The Dumbbell Nebula (also known as Messier 27, M 27, or NGC 6853) is a planetary nebula (PN) in the constellation Vulpecula, at a distance of about 1,360 light years.
This object was the first planetary nebula to be discovered; by Charles Messier in 1764. At its brightness of visual magnitude 7.5 and its diameter of about 8 arcminutes, it is easily visible in binoculars, and a popular observing target in amateur telescopes.

Read more

Google earth file: Messier 27.kmz (2kb, kmz)

Position (2000): RA 19 59 36.340 | Dec +22 43' 16.09''



__________________


L

Posts: 131433
Date:
The Dumbbell Nebula
Permalink  
 


The Dumbbell Nebula, also known as M27, (the 27th object on Messier's list) is a planetary nebula, the type of nebula our Sun will produce when nuclear fusion stops in its core.


Expand

M27 is one of the brightest planetary nebulae on the sky, and can be seen in the constellation Vulpecula with binoculars.
It takes light about 1000 years to reach us from M27.

Understanding the physics and significance of M27 was well beyond 18th century science. Even today, many things remain mysterious about bipolar planetary nebula like M27, including the physical mechanism that expels a low-mass star's gaseous outer-envelope, leaving an X-ray hot white dwarf.



__________________
Page 1 of 1  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.



Create your own FREE Forum
Report Abuse
Powered by ActiveBoard