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TOPIC: Ariane5 ES-ATV


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Jules Verne Automatic Transfer Vehicle
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For the first time, the compatibility of the final Jules Verne Automatic Transfer Vehicle flight software has been successfully tested this month with the rest of the vast ISS flight software by international teams at the NASA Software Verification Facility (SVF) in Houston.
 This ISS-level stage test, the so-called five-box test, is a new step where the ATV software is integrated into the whole ISS software ground testbed. It was conducted for 12 days over three weeks by some 43 engineers from NASA, ESA, Astrium, RSC-Energia and Boeing at the SVF Software Development and Integration Laboratory (SDIL), a few miles from NASA's Johnson Space Centre. Another 30 people behind the scenes also provided support on site, in Russia and Europe.  

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ATV arrives at Europe's Spaceport
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After a transatlantic crossing by sea, Jules Verne, the first Automated Transfer Vehicle for the International Space Station, arrived at Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, yesterday morning.
 Nearly two weeks after leaving Rotterdam harbour, the French cargo ship MN Toucan, carrying around 400 tonnes of spacecraft and equipment for the Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV), sailed into Pariacabo harbour on Monday afternoon.
Operations to unload the International Space Station (ISS) re-supply cargo spacecraft started later the same day. The final section of the ATV spacecraft was disembarked on Tuesday morning and driven by truck to the S5 building at Europe's Spaceport.

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RE: Ariane5 ES-ATV
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The first European cargo ship to fly to the International Space Station is en route this week to its South American launch site in preparation for an orbital debut in January.
Three times larger than the Russian Progress spacecraft, the Automated Transfer Vehicle, or ATV, is designed to deliver food, water, fuel and supplies to the $100 billion outpost, which is a little more than half finished.

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The European Space Agency's Jules Verne automated cargo ship has begun the journey to its launch site in Kourou, French Guiana. The ship will deliver cargo to the International Space Station.

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The Jules Vernes cargo ship has been packed up ready for despatch to the European spaceport in French Guiana.
The vehicle - the biggest, most complex spacecraft ever built in Europe - will launch in January with up to 7.5 tonnes of supplies for the space station.
The ship has been under test for three years at the European Space Agency's technical centre in the Netherlands.
Late on Friday it began the transfer by road and canal to Rotterdam, from where it will go by sea to South America.

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Automated Transfer Vehicle
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The European Space Agency says its first Automated Transfer Vehicle, called the Jules Verne, will be ready for launch early next year.
The spacecraft will be shipped to Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, in mid-July for a launch that's been revised because of "heavy traffic" at International Space Station. It had been scheduled to lift off during a September-November launch window.
Once in Kourou, the ATV will have to undergo integration and further tests before a more precise launch date is set.

Source UPI

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Jules Verne - ATV
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Jules Verne, the first of five Automated Transfer Vehicles, is set to be launched in the second half of 2007. This week, together with the ATV Project Manager and the Cargo Operations-Integration Engineer, EuroNews learns more about this cargo ship's various functions.

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RE: Ariane5 ES-ATV
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The maiden launch of a European-built cargo spacecraft has been delayed from this summer until at least September so more testing can be done, officials said.
The first lift off of the first Automated Transfer Vehicle, or ATV, had been scheduled for July 25, but that launch date was changed to September, and may be pushed back even further into November or next year, Kirk Shireman, Nasa's deputy programme manager of the international space station, said Tuesday.

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Jules Verne, the first of five Automated Transfer Vehicles (ATV), stands on the brink of flight. Its hardware is 100 percent assembled and ready to fly. The inaugural mission, set for the second half of 2007, will follow an extensive three-year test campaign.
Prime contractor and ESA teams are working overtime to finish the testing of the most complex spaceship ever developed in Europe. During the coming crucial months, this state-of-the-art programme faces three key concurrent objectives: to fully prepare for Flight Operations, to fine-tune the interfaces with the International Space Station and the Station partners, and to prepare Ariane 5 for launching its largest payload to date.

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Jules Verne, the first Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV), will be launched next year by a specific version of Ariane 5 called the Ariane 5 Evolution Storable upper stage Automated Transfer Vehicle, or A5 ES-ATV for short.

Although the ATV does not use the powerful ECA version of Ariane 5, which was launched successfully into geostationary orbit in February 2005, it does need an Ariane 5 equipped with the powerful Vulcain 2 main engine, and featuring the storable propellant upper stage (Etage à Propergols Stockables or EPS) and its re-ignitable engine, the Aestus.
Some adaptations to the launcher are also necessary to ensure compatibility with the heavy ATV spacecraft and its specific delivery orbit. For the recurring flights, the launcher will inject the 20 750 kg ATV into the International Space Station orbital plane in low Earth orbit at 300 km altitude inclined 51.6 degrees above the Equator. For the first ATV mission, Jules Verne with a mass of 19 600 kg, the orbit is also slightly lower at 260 km.



Since it is the first time the European heavy launcher will aim at such a low Earth orbit (LEO) trajectory and since it will launch its heaviest payload ever, the Ariane 5 ES-ATV is going through some hardware adaptation and some specific tests and studies.
The 20 750 kg ATV mass represents more than twice the heaviest single payload Ariane 5 has ever lifted in the past, including Envisat, the 8-tonne environment satellite.
To handle such a heavy-weight, the Vehicle Equipment Bay, supporting the ATV on top of the launcher, has been structurally redesigned and strengthened accordingly,” - Julio Monreal, ESA's head of Ariane operations support, in charge of the ATV-Ariane 5 interfaces.



The second main adaptation activity has been to analyze and review the piloting of the 775-tonne Ariane 5 during ascent and insertion taking into consideration the aerodynamic, thermal and electromagnetic environments. With such a huge mass at the top of Ariane 5, the rocket's centre of gravity is quite different to any previous Ariane 5 launch.
It will be a major milestone for Ariane 5 to lift such a record payload in low Earth orbit and it will show a new capability of this multi-task launcher. The work to enlarge the Ariane 5 flight domain has been made possible thanks to the united efforts of teams from ESA, CNES, Arianespace and the Ariane industry”, - Jean-Michel Desobeau, Arianespace's ATV Programme Director.

Jules Verne ascent and insertion

About three and a half minutes after lift-off from Europe's Spaceport in French Guiana, the Ariane 5 long version fairing protecting the ATV is ejected.
Five and a half minutes later, the main cryogenic stage (Etage à Propergol Cryogénique or EPC) separates, leaving the ATV attached to the upper stage.
The upper stage carries the ATV to a circular orbit at an altitude of 260 km, using two powered phases with its Aestus motor, separated by a 45-minute ballistic phase:
- After EPC separation, the EPS upper stage motor, Aestus, is ignited for about eight minutes, over the Atlantic Ocean, before the ballistic trajectory, which describes half an orbit around the Earth.



- Whilst passing over southeast Australia, the Ariane 5 re-ignites, a first time, for 40 seconds its EPS upper stage Aestus motor to circularize the orbit at an altitude of 260 km. Four minutes later, the ATV separates over the Pacific and becomes a fully automated spaceship, navigating towards the International Space Station.
- Meanwhile, the EPS and the equipment bay of the Ariane 5 fulfil a last and important task. One orbit later, now over western Australia, Aestus re-ignites briefly, for a second time, causing the launcher to de-orbit safely and burn up during a precise re-entry over a predefined uninhabited South Pacific area.



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