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Post Info TOPIC: Laacher See


L

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RE: Laacher See super-volcano
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Is a super-volcano just 390 miles from London about to erupt?



A sleeping super-volcano in Germany is showing worrying signs of waking up.
It's lurking just 390 miles away underneath the tranquil Laacher See lake near Bonn and is capable of ejecting billions of tons of magma.
This monster erupts every 10 to 12,000 years and last went off 12,900 years ago, so it could blow at any time.

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L

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RE: Laacher See
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If you've ever eaten a sandy batch of shellfish, you know the feeling: the terrible crunching and grinding that cracks through your jaw, making you question the wisdom of your choice of food. Now imagine that feeling with every bite you take, every meal of every day.
If a new study is right, that's what early humans and animals felt after the Laacher See supervolcano exploded in central Europe 13,000 years ago, and it drove them out of the region.

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"The last ice age came to an end between 12,000 to 15,000 years ago and the ice sheets that once covered central Europe shrank dramatically. The impact on the continent's geology can by measured by the jump in volcanic activity that occurred at this time" - Professor David Pyle, of Oxford University's earth sciences department.

In the Eiffel region of western Germany a huge eruption created a vast caldera, or basin-shaped crater, 12,900 years ago, for example. This has since flooded to form the Laacher See, near Koblenz. Scientists are now studying volcanic regions in Chile and Alaska - where glaciers and ice sheets are shrinking rapidly as the planet heats up - in an effort to anticipate the eruptions that might be set off.

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Eifelb.jpg
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Latitude: 5024'47.34"N, Longitude: 716'15.87"E

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L

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Laacher See Volcano
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Title: Evolution and environmental impacts of the eruption of Laacher See Volcano (Germany) 12,900 a BP
Authors: Hans-Ulrich Schmincke, Cornelia Park and Eduard Harms

Laacher See Volcano (LSV), 40 km south of Bonn, explosively erupted ca. 6.3 km of chemically strongly zoned phonolite magma probably during spring, 12,900 years ago, the resulting eruption column having reached at least 20 km in height. The bulk of the Laacher See Tephra (LST) was deposited east of the volcano within the Neuwied Basin. LST ashes form the most important stratigraphic marker in Lateglacial deposits over much of Central Europe. A minimum of 2 Mt total S was calculated to have been released during the eruption by comparing pre- and posteruptive volatile concentrations in glass inclusions and pumice matrix glasses. Because a separate S-bearing vapour phase was probably present in the magma prior to eruption as indicated by the high melt-H2O contents close to saturation level, the actual amount of S released during the eruption, could have significantly exceeded 2 Mt. The sulphuric acid aerosol layer resulting from the massive stratospheric S-input probably resided in the stratosphere for years and most likely had a significant impact on climate and thus the environment. Increased precipitation in central Europe and/or impairment of the vegetation cover for several years is suggested by several proxies, especially increased sediment supply into lakes. Proximal to the eruptive center, major environmental impacts include an initial blast that felled trees up to 4 km away from vent. Fast deposition of huge tephra volumes led to the complete disruption of Rhine River within the lower Neuwied Basin and the damming up of a lake ca. 140 km in areal extent. Sudden collapse of the temporary tephra dam caused a catastrophic flood wave downstream whose deposits are recognised as far north as Bonn. Reworking of unconsolidated tephra deposits over several 100 km was widespread and extensive, generating abundant lahars and flood plain deposits. A braided-river system, established in Neuwied Basin, probably persisted up to several years. Recent reports for a second eruption of LSV are not confirmed.

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Laacher See
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Laacher See or Laach Lake (in English) is a caldera lake in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, situated close to the cities of Koblenz, Mayen (11 km), and Andernach (14 km). It fills a volcanic caldera in the Eifel mountain range, the only caldera in Central Europe. It is part of the area of the "east Eifel volcanic field".

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