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Post Info TOPIC: September 2009


L

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RE: September 2009
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Look for Venus in the east before sunrise Friday, while the nearly full moon is setting in the west.
If you gaze directly east, Venus will be just above the horizon from 4:30 to 5 a.m. Because of its brightness, Venus is easily seen low in the sky and in twilight.

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Saturn passes conjunction with the sun on Sept. 17 so is not visible. Look in the southeast as soon as the sun sets and you will find the king of the planets, Jupiter. It is the brightest starlike object in that portion of the sky. If you have any of the new electronic locaters you can see it during daylight.
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Jupiter to be visible near moon tonight
People across Ireland will have a rare opportunity to see Jupiter visible as a brilliant 'star' just beneath the moon tonight.
From about 9pm until sunrise, the gas giant - which is 300 times the weight of the Earth - will be observable under the nearly-full moon, weather permitting.

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On the 3rd September, 2009, Jupiter will appear to lose all four of its largest moons.

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Sept. 6-12, 2009

Uranus is typically visible only with binoculars or a small telescope, but at times, it enters the realm of naked-eye visibility for stargazers with excellent vision and a clear, dark sky far from city lights.
And this week is just one of those times. It's a perfect occasion to get out into the wilderness to search for this elusive planet.

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Jupiter rules the night, rising about 7 p.m. in the constellation Capricornus and shining at magnitude -2.8.
If you look in the south at 1 a.m. on Thursday with your binoculars, you'll see a gathering of Jupiter, the waxing gibbous moon and Neptune. What you won't see are the four Galilean moons - Io, Callisto, Europa and Ganymede. All four are invisible behind, in front, or in the shadow of Jupiter. Ten years will pass before this occurs again.

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On Sept. 22, Jupiter is at heliocentric conjunction with Neptune; that is, passes it as seen from the sun. This is the first change in the order of the four outer planets around the sky since Jupiter overtook Saturn on June 22, 2000.

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There will be a couple of rare and unusual highlights this September. Another rare event will happen around the King of the Planets. All four of Jupiter's large Galilean moons, first discovered by Galileo through his telescope 400 years ago, will disappear at the same time. That only happens a few times each century.
It will start at 12:43 a.m. EDT on Sept. 3 and continue until about 2:29 a.m. Europa and Ganymede will pass in front, and Io and Callisto will sneak around behind the planet.

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