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The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) captured the top image of the Colima volcano on June 3, 2005, just hours after two spectacular eruptions rumbled from the volcano.


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Two days later, on June 5, Colima experienced its strongest eruption in 20 years when it sent a dark column of ash more than five kilometres into the atmosphere at a rate of roughly 30 kilometres per hour


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Forty-five people were evacuated from a nearby hamlet.
The villagers were taken from the settlement of Juan Barragan after an eruption on Monday night. It was the first evacuation since the volcano started blasting out ashes, dust and rocks.
The villagers were taken to a temporary shelter overnight.


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Mexico's "Fire Volcano" spewed ashes almost 5 km high yesterday, its third big explosion in two weeks.

No casualties were reported after the afternoon eruption of the 3860m Colima volcano in the western state of the same name.
Authorities in Ciudad Guzman, close to the volcano, were prepared to evacuate towns should the need arise.
Ash fell on the nearby settlements of Tonila and San Marcos, but evacuations were ruled out after authorities toured communities near the volcano.
Volcano specialists were to meet today to discuss whether to extend a safety perimeter around the volcano that currently stretches at least five miles from the crater.

Roiling debris from the explosion at 2:20 p.m. engulfed the peak and sparked small fires on the lower slopes.



The Colima Volcano had staged two spectacular eruptions Thursday night and Friday morning, following smaller explosive eruptions on May 23 and May 30.

Scientists at the University of Colima said Sunday's explosion was 20 per cent larger than the May 30 eruption.


-- Edited by Blobrana at 19:46, 2005-06-06

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This image was captured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer onboard the Terra satellite, and is from January 8; it shows Colima in the centre of the picture. A twisting plume of ash and steam rises above the summit of the volcano.

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Animated Webcam images of recent activity at Colima. May 24th 2005

Webcam1 (1Mb)

Webcam2 (1Mb)

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Update:
No injuries or damages were reported the nearest settlement is about four miles away. Winds blew the ash cloud toward the west, away from the most heavily populated
areas.
Tonatiuh Dominguez, a seismologist at the volcano observation station operated by
the University of Colima, warned that the peak "is still in an explosive stage."
Experts said it was the biggest explosion at the volcano in the western state of Colima
since 1991. The Colima volcano, which has erupted violently dozens of times since its
first recorded eruption in 1560, is considered to be among the most active and
potentially the most destructive of the volcanoes in Mexico.
Extract:

Central Mexico Latest satellite image

Colima 19.51N 103.62W

Java animation


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L

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Colima Volcano
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Mexicos so-called "Fire Volcano" erupted today spewing lava and glowing rocks in its biggest explosion since 1999.
A huge grey column of smoke billowed into the evening air from a crater of the 3860m volcano in the western state of Colima, according to television images.
The "Fire volcano" is in a sparsely populated rural area about 500km from the Mexican capital.
There were no immediate plans to evacuate any of the tiny villages that lie around the volcano..


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"There was an explosion that sent up a column of smoke some 4km into the air. We are monitoring the situation but for the moment there is no need to evacuate." - Luis Salazar, operations director of the Civil Protection agency in Colima.
The Colima volcanic complex is the most prominent volcanic centre of the western Mexican Volcanic Belt. It consists of two southward young volcanoes, Nevado de Colima (the 4,320 m high point of the complex) on the North and the 3850-m-high historically active Volcán de Colima at the south. Volcán de Colima (also known as Volcán Fuego) is a young stratovolcano constructed within a 5-km-wide caldera, breached to the South, that has been the source of large debris avalanches.
A group of cinder cones of probable late-Pleistocene age is located on the floor of the Colima graben west and east of the Colima complex
Major slope failures have occurred repeatedly from both the Nevado and Colima cones, and have produced a thick apron of debris-avalanche deposits on three sides of the complex.



Frequent historical eruptions have mostly originated from Colima's summit crater. The eruptions date back to the 16th century. A major explosive eruption occurred in 1913 and destroyed the summit and left a deep, steep-sided crater that was slowly refilled and then overtopped by lava dome growth.
The current eruptive episode began in November 1998 and has included summit lava-dome growth, block lava flows, pyroclastic flows, and intermittent explosive activity.

Universidad de Colima



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