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L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Vista Brute Force Keygen
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 Vista Brute Force Keygen

1: download the file slmgr.zip

2: make a backup of C:\windows\system32\slmgr.vbs (in case the keygen works, replace it back with the original)

3: use slmgr.vbs from the zip-file to replace the one in C:\windows\system32\. If you have problems with permissions, select file...goto properties....take ownership....then change permissions.

4: write down your partial or entire productkey. You can check your key with "magic jellybean"

5: goto Start > Run, type "cmd" and OK. Now type "C:\windows\system32\slmgr.vbs -ipk generate". A process called "wscript.exe" will start and can take quite a lot of CPU resources. It will check aprox. 10000 keys per 30 minutes.

6: now the waiting begins. It can take very very very long before you get some results

7: after some time (hours, days) check your productkey with "magic jellybean" again to see if it has changed

8: if your serial has changed try to activate Vista by going to Start > Run. Now type the command "C:\windows\system32\slmgr.vbs -ato"

Source

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L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Vista Upgrade secret
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There is a well known Windows Vista Upgrade secret in the IT community...
The "secret" is that the setup program (setup.exe) in Windows Vista's upgrade version will accept an installed copy of XP, W2K, or an un-activated copy of Vista itself as evidence of a previous installation.
...and it is this last option that enables you to perform a "clean install" of an upgrade version of Windows Vista to any formatted or unformatted hard drive! Basically you are installing Windows Vista twice to take advantage of this trick.

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L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Vista Ready?
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Vista's new graphics engine is causing first person shoot-em-ups to crash.
According to ComputerWorld, CounterStrike, Half-Life 2, Doom 3 and F.E.A.R are all fragged when punters try to play them on Vista.
Quoting gaming bulletin boards, ComputerWorld noted that the gamers complain that frame rates have dropped down the lav since they upgraded.
Being blamed are flaky software drivers, Vista’s complexity, and a shortage of video cards which can handle DirectX 10.
Vole promised that Vista would be backwards-compatible with XP’s graphic engine, DirectX 9, and that it will support existing games. Clearly it was not.

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L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Windows Vista BootScreen
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The Windows Vista BootScreen is pointless, but Microsoft decided to hide a more visually appealing boot screen that can easily be enabled with very little trouble. I’m not sure why they didn’t make the boot screen better.

Type msconfig into the start menu search box, and hit enter. Click the Boot tab, and then check the “No GUI boot” checkbox. Hit OK and reboot the computer. You should see the new boot screen immediately."

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L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Windows Vista
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Windows Vista clearly is not a great new performer when it comes to executing single applications at maximum speed. Although we only looked at the 32-bit version of Windows Vista Enterprise, we do not expect the 64-bit edition to be faster (at least not with 32-bit applications).
Overall, applications performed as expected, or executed slightly slower than under Windows XP. The synthetic benchmarks such as Everest, PCMark05 or Sandra 2007 show that differences are non-existent on a component level. We also found some programs that refused to work, and others that seem to cause problems at first but eventually ran properly. In any case, we recommend watching for Vista-related software upgrades from your software vendors.
There are some programs that showed deeply disappointing performance. Unreal Tournament 2004 and the professional graphics benchmarking suite SPECviewperf 9.03 suffered heavily from the lack of support for the OpenGL graphics library under Windows Vista. This is something we expected, and we clearly advise against replacing Windows XP with Windows Vista if you need to run professional graphics applications. Both ATI and Nvidia will offer OpenGL support in upcoming driver releases, but it remains to be seen if and how other graphics vendors or Microsoft may offer it.

We are disappointed that CPU-intensive applications such as video transcoding with XviD (DVD to XviD MPEG4) or the MainConcept H.264 Encoder performed 18% to nearly 24% slower in our standard benchmark scenarios. Both benchmarks finished much quicker under Windows XP. There aren't newer versions available, and we don't see immediate solutions to this issue.
There is good news as well: we did not find evidence that Windows Vista's new and fancy AeroGlass interface consumes more energy than Windows XP's 2D desktop. Although our measurements indicate a 1 W increase in power draw at the plug, this is too little of a difference to draw any conclusions. Obviously, the requirements for displaying all elements in 3D, rotating and moving them aren't enough to heat up graphics processors. This might also be a result of Windows Vista's more advanced implementation of ACPI 2.0 (and parts of 3.0), which allows the control of power of system components separately.
Our hopes that Vista might be able to speed up applications are gone. First tests with 64-bit editions result in numbers similar to our 32-bit results, and we believe it's safe to say that users looking for more raw performance will be disappointed with Vista. Vista is the better Windows, because it behaves better, because it looks better and because it feels better. But it cannot perform better than Windows XP. Is this a K.O. for Windows Vista in the enthusiast space?
If you really need your PC to finish huge encoding, transcoding or rendering workloads within a defined time frame, yes, it is. Don't do it; stay with XP. But as long as you don't need to finish workloads in record time, we believe it makes sense to consider these three bullet points:

    * Vista runs considerably more services and thus has to spend somewhat more resources on itself. Indexing, connectivity and usability don't come for free.
    * There is a lot of CPU performance available today! We've got really fast dual core processors, and even faster quad cores will hit the market by the middle of the year. Even though you will lose application performance by upgrading to Vista, today's hardware is much faster than yesterday's, and tomorrow's processors will clearly leap even further ahead.
    * No new Windows release has been able to offer more application performance than its predecessor.

Although application performance has had this drawback, the new Windows Vista performance features SuperFetch and ReadyDrive help to make Vista feel faster and smoother than Windows XP.

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L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Vista
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Vista Home and Vista Home Premium editions explicitly prevent you from running the software in a virtual machine.

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L

Posts: 131433
Date:
RE: Longhorn
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The freedoms built in to the net are under attack like never before, argues regular columnist Bill Thompson.
The launch of Windows Vista last week was accompanied by widespread criticism from advocates of open systems, open networks and the free flow of information.
Particular attention was lavished on the digital rights management (DRM) features of the new operating system, the tools that determine whether you can play or copy video or audio on your computer.
Vista's DRM even aroused the wrath of the Green Party, which condemned it for requiring "more expensive and energy-hungry hardware".

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L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Live OneCare Flaw
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Security tools that work with Windows Vista have failed tests to see if they can detect viruses circulating online.
Microsoft's Windows Live OneCare security tool was one of four products that failed independent tests carried out by the Virus Bulletin.
The security testing group found that Live OneCare missed far more active viruses than any other program tested.
To pass the tests anti-virus tools must spot and stop 100% of the malicious programs used to attack them.

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L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Vista Flaw
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Microsoft has admitted that speech recognition features in Vista could be hijacked so that a PC tells itself to delete files or folders.
Vista can respond to vocal commands and concern has been raised about malicious audio on websites or sent via e-mail.
In one scenario outlined by users a MP3 file of voice instructions was used to tell the PC to delete documents.
Microsoft said the exploit was "technically possible" but there was no need to worry.

Source

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L

Posts: 131433
Date:
Vista
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Every Vista DVD includes the ability to install any edition of Vista without a product key. When you install without a product key, you get an automatic 30 day evaluation period.
You can extend the 30-day Windows Vista grace period to 120 days.
This is an official, supported operation  from Microsoft.
To extend the grace period another 30 days, simply start a command prompt as Administrator, and issue this command:

slmgr -rearm

Reboot for the change to take effect. You can only extend three times, so the total grace period for a Vista evaluation is 120 days.

Source: Bink.nu

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