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RE: Mount Qomolangma
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Fifteen Expedition members scaled Mount Qomolangma, also known as Mount Everest, at 11:08 a.m. May 22, 2005. (Beijing Time)
The 15 included: Pubu, Ngawang, Gyabu Jr. and Dorji Gaesang of the Tibet Mountaineering Team, and surveyors.
They are erecting a survey beacon, GPS and radar equipment on top of the peak for height measurement.
A ceremony was held at the base camp to celebrate the successful scaling of the peak.


Ji Ji

Twenty-four Chinese researchers and mountaineers started their assault on Mount Qomolangma, the highest summit on earth, to remeasure its height at 3:30 a.m. on Sunday.


-- Edited by Blobrana at 21:20, 2005-05-22

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RE: Tibet Plateau
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Fang Xiaomin, a researcher at the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, said that the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau is still very young compared to other geological formations; and that the world's highest plateau rose to its height roughly eight million years ago.
A collision between the Indian Plate and the Eurasian Continent Plate 40 million years ago shaped the plateau and its surrounding geological features.
The proof the plateau's young age comes from studies of ancient Asian monsoons and highland loess.
The Himalayas continue to rise by an average of 10 millimetres annually, Mount Qomolangma, (Everest) whose current official height is 8,848 meters, is the highest peak on the plateau.
The two plates of the Earth's crust are still colliding. This means that the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau moves north by more than 20 millimetres and upwards by several millimetres each year.



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QOMOLANGMA BASE CAMP, Tibet, May 20:
A team of 22 Chinese surveyors and women mountaineers, lead by Zhang Jiangyuan, are working to re-measure the height of Qomolangma, also known as Mount Everest, left the 7,028-meter-high camp to head for a camp at higher elevation.



The team reached the camp on Thursday and is expected to rest at another camp at 7,790 meters above sea level before hiking to the summit Sunday or Monday.
The team will re-measure Everest, which, according to China's first measurement in 1975, is 8,848.13 meters above sea level.
It snowed in the Qomolangma area in early Friday morning, but the weather will not influence the climb.
A second group of 22 surveyors and mountaineers will set off from the base camp towards the 7,028-meter-high camp Friday afternoon. They are expected to reach the summit a day after the first group.



The ascent of the mountain, which straddles the border of Tibet and Nepal, was originally scheduled for May 5. It has been repeatedly delayed because of poor weather. The peak has seen frequent heavy snows and strong winds since early May. Mountaineering experts say turbulent weather is rare in recent years.
The expedition is part of China's scientific research program on the mountain, which began in March.



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Global warming is shrinking glaciers on the Tibet side of Mount Everest faster than ever, putting world water supplies at risk.
Chinese scientists researching the world's tallest peak, which China refers to by its Tibetan name, "Qomolangma," had found clear evidence of increasing glacial melting.
Global warming has resulted in glaciers melting fast at the Mount Qomolangma area, Tibet, threatening the balance of global water resources.
Around 75 percent of the world's fresh water is stored in glacial ice, much of it in mountain areas, allowing for heavy winter rain and snowfall to be released gradually into river networks throughout the summer or dry months.
Glaciers maintain a balance between ice accumulation and melting. Growing melting area means less fresh water reserves for the world in the future.
The Chinese scientists had found the melting point of one Everest glacier had risen around 50 metres in just two years, more than twice as fast as normal, while a huge, high-altitude ice cliff seen in 2002.
An expedition in 2002 had observed a 30-metre ice cliff at an altitude of 5,600 meters, but had apparently disappeared this year.
An expedition in 2004 set more than 20 poles for scientific purposes at altitudes from 6,300 to 6,500 metres, but they only found four left this year, showing the melting glaciers have taken them away.
Similar melting has been reported on Nepal's side of the mountain. The United Nations warned in 2002 that more than 40 Himalayan glacial lakes were dangerously close to bursting, endangering thousands of people, because of global warming.
Scientists say global warming could drive the average global temperature up by 1.4-5.8 degrees Celsius over the next 100 years, which would cause glaciers to retreat and oceans to rise and swamp low-lying areas around the world.

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