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RE: Mount Everest
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China and Nepal have agreed a solution to a long-running disagreement over the height of Mount Everest.
They agreed that the world's highest mountain - which traverses the border of the two countries - should be recognised as being 8,848m tall.

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Mountaineering experts believe they have identified the final resting place of the most famous climber to go missing on Everest. After close scrutiny of aerial photographs, they believe they have spotted the frozen remains of of Andrew "Sandy" Irvine, who disappeared with his climbing partner George Mallory close to the summit in 1924.
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UN climate body admits 'mistake' on Himalayan glaciers

The vice-chairman of the UN's climate science panel admits that it made a mistake in asserting that Himalayan glaciers could disappear by 2035.
The IPCC gave the wrong date for Himalayan glacier melt, but says it does not change the picture of man-made climate change.

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Tibetan Plateau
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Black Soot Choking Tibetan Glaciers

On the Tibetan Plateau, temperatures are rising and glaciers are melting faster than climate scientists would expect based on global warming alone. A recent study of ice cores from five Tibetan glaciers by NASA and Chinese scientists confirmed the likely culprit: rapid increases in black soot concentrations since the 1990s, mostly from air pollution sources over Asia, especially the Indian subcontinent. Soot-darkened snow and glaciers absorb sunlight, which hastens melting, adding to the impact of global warming.
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Ancestors of human beings began to settle down on the Tibetan Plateau in the late Palaeolithic Period (Old Stone Age) at least 21,000 years ago, reported Chinas official Xinhuanet Dec 10, citing a study completed recently by researchers of the Kunming Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.
It said the study was a systemic and comprehensive one on the matrilinear inheritance structure of the modern Tibetan people.

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Nepal home to more than 5,300 lakes
Though it appears to be a small country in the globe, Nepal boasts of more than 5,300 lakes, if a recent study of researchers is to be believed.
The study was conducted by the researchers of Nepal Lake Conservation Development
Committee (NLCDC) - a government body established under
the Ministry of Tourism and Civil Aviation in 2006. Experts from Nepal Academy of Science and Technology and National Trust for Nature Conservation were also among the researchers.

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BYU geologist solves mystery of glaciers that grew while Asia heated up

Ice, when heated, is supposed to melt.
That's why a collection of glaciers in the Southeast Himalayas stymies those who know what they did 9,000 years ago. While most other Central Asian glaciers retreated under hotter summer temperatures, this group of glaciers advanced from one to six kilometres.
A new study by BYU geologist Summer Rupper pieces together the chain of events surrounding the unexpected glacial growth.

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Himalayan glacier studies commence
After a long gap, scientists in Nepal have embarked on the first field studies of Himalayan glacial lakes, some of which are feared to be swelling dangerously due to global warming.
In May, they completed the field visit to the first location, a lake in the Everest region, in a series of studies.

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Nepali Minister for Forest and Soil Conversation Kiran Gurung said more than 20 glacial lakes in Nepal have been posing danger of outburst at any time due to the melting of ice on the Himalayas, the National News Agency RSS reported on Thursday.

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Tibetan plateau
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Eocene Tibetan plateau remnants preserved in the northwest Himalaya
Isolated high, flat surfaces in the north-west Himalaya may be remnants of the Tibetan plateau, suggests a new paper published online today, 26 April 2009, in Nature Geoscience. These surfaces seem to have persisted over the past 40 million years, confirming that the plateau formed soon after the India-Asia continental collision.
A team of scientists, led by Peter van der Beek of the University of Grenoble, studied the landscape of north-west Himalaya and the western Tibetan plateau, identifying broad, high regions beyond the western margin of the Tibetan plateau. The authors found that these surfaces had been eroded very slowly over millions of years - in marked contrast with prominent Himalayan peaks, but similar to the western Tibetan plateau. This similarity to the erosion history of the Tibetan plateau indicates that in the past, the plateau must have extended further than its current western boundary.

Source: Nature


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