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RE: Goodwill moon rock
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Each "goodwill Moon rock" was encased in a lucite ball and mounted on a wooden plaque with the recipient nations' flag attached.
There were 370 pieces gathered for this purpose from the two missions. Two hundred and seventy were given to nations of the world and 100 to the 50 US states. But 184 of these are lost, stolen or unaccounted for - 160 around the world and 24 in the US.

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Missing moon rocks
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What has happened to Nasa's missing moon rocks?

The US space agency Nasa recently announced that half of the moon rocks brought back to Earth from two Apollo space missions have gone missing. They were given as gifts to the nations of the world. So what happened to them?
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NASA loses hundreds of moon, space rocks

Astronauts may have had the 'right stuff' to go to the moon, but when it comes to keeping track of what they brought back, NASA seems to have misplaced some of that stuff.
In a report issued by the agency's Inspector General today, NASA concedes that more than 500 pieces of moon rocks, meteorites, comet chunks and other space material were stolen or have been missing since 1970. That includes 218 moon samples that were stolen and later returned and about two dozen moon rocks and chunks of lunar soil that were reported lost last year.

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Arkansas Goodwill moon rock
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Lost moon rock found among Bill Clinton files

Only 843 pounds of moon rocks exist on Earth, according to NASA.
Now, 30 years after it went missing, one of those precious rocks has been found among memorabilia belonging to former President Bill Clinton.

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Goodwill moon rocks
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The Apollo 17 "Goodwill" moon rocks - not seen for three decades, presumed lost or even stolen - were unveiled Wednesday in a ceremony at the Colorado School of Mines Geology Museum.
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The "goodwill" moon rock given to Missouri nearly 40 years ago is, indeed, missing.
In May, the Missouri State Museum claimed the rock was safe and sound in the basement of the state Capitol, not lost as reported in a story from The Record of Hackensack, N.J., reprinted in the Tribune. Interim Director Linda Endersby e-mailed the Tribune photos of the lunar display to prove it.
Turns out, though, the photo was of rocks from the Apollo 11 mission - not the Apollo 17 moon rocks given as goodwill gifts to all 50 states and 135 foreign countries.

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Missing moon rock now back in W.Va. hands

A piece of the moon is back in state custody.
State Culture and History spokeswoman Jacqueline Proctor says the rock fragment was collected Sunday from retired Morgantown dentist Robert Conner.

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A missing piece of the moon may have been found in Morgantown.
Retired dentist Robert Conner learned Friday that the 1-gram rock fragment he found in his late brother's possessions a decade ago was actually presented to the state by NASA during the 1970s.

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A moon rock missing for decades was located Tuesday.
It turns out it is at the home of a former Colorado governor.
The search for the moon rocks, given to the governors of all 50 states in 1974, picked up recently when a retired NASA employee -- now a professor at the University of Phoenix -- gave his students an assignment to track them down.

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Four decades later, many of the samples can't be found. Some were taken by government leaders after they left office or perhaps given away to colleagues, friends or relatives. Some turned up on the black market. Some were relegated to museum storage rooms. Others might be on display in obscure museums or government buildings, but we can't know for sure because nobody kept track.
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