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TOPIC: June 2009


L

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RE: June 2009
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There are several great red spot crossings for Jupiter images and observers this week. Currently there is one small faint region for solar observers to find. There is an hour and half of astronomical darkness this weekend so take a look at Messier 57, the Ring Nebula, in constellation Lyra in the evening.

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The magnitude 9 asteroid (2) Pallas will occult the magnitude 10.7 star TYC 0202-00295-1 in the constellation Canis Minor, at around  22:43 UT, 9th June 2009.
The event will be visible from Brazil/Bolivia region. The estimated magnitude drop is only 0.2, for at most 12.7 seconds.

Position (2000): RA 08 07 03.0889,  Dec +04 54 42.830

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L

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Venus and Mars will put on a show for early risers this month. The two "morning stars" have moved to within 3 degrees of each other above the eastern horizon and will keep very close company until July.
The mismatched duo of Venus, shining at a dazzling -- 4.4 magnitude, and Mars, shining less than one-hundredth as bright at 1.1 magnitude, now stands almost 15 degrees above the eastern horizon, one hour before the sun rises.

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This month is a good one for stargazers to view the planets, all but one of which will be visible in the eastern sky.
The only downside is that there are not as many hours of darkness for sky watchers in June, says Daniel LeBlanc of Moncton, president of the Beauséjour Astronomy Club and a member of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, New Brunswick Centre.
Blame that on the lengthy hours of daylight this month including the longest day of the year, which is the first official day of summer, LeBlanc explained.

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L

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Coma Bernices
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Out of the strange collection of heroes, heroines, animals and other assorted entities that make up the star pictures we have formed as the constellations of the night sky, none is stranger than the constellation Coma Bernices or Bernices Hair. It is just to the west of overhead in this months early evening Colorado sky.
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This clustering of faint stars is located about halfway between the bright stars Arcturus in Bootes and Regulus in the constellation of Leo the Lion. At one time, this faint asterism actually belonged to Leo as a tuft on a much more extended version of Leos tail. Leos tail tuft became a casualty of history in the 3rd century B.C. when Egypt was ruled by the pharaoh Ptolemy III and his wife Bernice. She possessed legendary beauty, the highlight of which was her long, flowing hair.

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L

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RE: June 2009
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Tonight the Moon will occult (pass in front of) the bright star Antares.

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L

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Anonymous

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Summer vacation season
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The summer vacation season is here and you should include night-sky viewing in your plans.

Your favorite bookstore should have a copy of either Sky & Telescope or Astronomy magazines, to help guide your eye. The best time to view the night sky is when the moon is not visible (or is less than half lit, at least). That means June 13 through 25 should be ideal viewing for evenings. Keep in mind that, because Seattle is so far north, it is only completely dark from 12:15 a.m. until 1:05 a.m. on June 21, the summer solstice.

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/outdoors/2009296716_nwwstarwatch04.html



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L

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Between 08:06 - 10:16 GMT on the 9th June, 2009, Jupiters moons, Io and Ganymede, will both simultaneously cast shadows onto the disk of the planet.
A high magnification on a modest telescope is all that is needed to view the event.

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L

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June and July have the shortest nights of the year in the Pacific Northwest, so good stargazing can't really begin until after 10 p.m., and the show's pretty much over by 4:30 a.m. when morning twilight begins.
The transition to summer skies is just about complete. The stars and constellations of winter are pretty much gone from our evening skies, all setting well before the sun.
The only bright winter stars left are Castor and Pollux in the constellation Gemini the Twins. Toward the end of evening twilight you can see them side by side in the very low northwestern sky.

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